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X Collection 



INDEX 



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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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Box Number 



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Total of 
Volumes 



151 




Call Number 






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Now Showing 



"Labor's Enemy-Mr. Dewey" 




* I COM TO m UNF£TTf R£P. 



*» 



Complete Program Inside 



Gullible 9 ® Troubles 



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In ancient days, Gulliver — caught off guard — was tied 
down by little men. In modern days, labor — caught off 
guard — has been tied down by little men — Taft, Hart- 
ley, Dewey, Ball, Martin, etc. 

A short, Short Story — — complete in this issue: 






*)3 



'...victory has become a habit of our party... 9 



THE ACCEPTANCE SPEECH OF 

President Harry §.Tr uiaian 



WITEI THE ACCEPTANCE SPEECH OF 

Senator Allien W. Barkley of Kentucky 

as nominees for President and Vice President of the 

Democratic Party at the National Convention in 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1943 



. . . the people know that the Democratic Party is the 
people's party, and the Republican Party is the party of 
special interest, end it always has been and always will 

be / must have your help. You must get in 

and push, and win this election 

THE COUNTRY CAN'T AFFORD 
ANOTHER REPUBLICAN CONGRESS! 



-* 



Extension of Remarks of Hon. Alben W. Barkley, 

of Kentucky, in the Senate of the United States 

July 28, 1948 

Not Printed at Government Expense 



792306—26701 



X-E 815 
•If*. 



THE 1948 PLATE© 




Of the 



W 



DEMOC1 



TIC PARTY 



*- 



! 



"0 SERVE the interest of all and not the few, 
to assure a world in which peace and justice 
can prevail; to achieve security, full produc- 
tion, and full employment 

THIS IS OUR PLATFORM! 



Extension of Remarks of 

HONORABLE ALBEI* W. BAIKKLEY 

Senator from Kentucky and the Democratic Nominee for 
VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

In the Senate of the United States, July 28, 1940 
Not Printed at Government Expense 



7D9305— 26759 



Uur goal must be — not peace in our lime — but peace for all time. ~ Hatty S. Truman X\ C 



— eaOTM 



Vol. 1, No. h$ 




DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMITTth 



Ring Building 
1200 lfith Street, H.W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 
March 6, 19^8 



World trade is a two-way street . 
We must buy if we want to sell . 

High tariff walls and artificial trade barriers benefit no nation, in cluding 
those which think they are protected by them . ~" 

History has demonstrated the truth of these statements. 

Now comes a test in the Congress which will show whether or not the Republican 
majority has learned these lessons of history. 

President Truman has asked the Congress to extend for three more years the Hull 
Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act which has been the economic cornerstone of our foreign 
policy for Ik years. 

The results of the act have been good. As President Truman wrote the Congress, 
the act has "provided a sound method for increasing world trade through progressive 
lowering of trade barriers, to the benefit of living standards both here and abroad." 

The President added: 

"The importance of the act is greater today than it has ever been. Together with 
other nations we are engaged in a mighty endeavor to build a prosperous and peaceful 
world. The financial assistance we have already contributed, and the further aid we 
shall give to nations in Europe and elsewhere, constitute a tremendous investment toward 
world recovery. 

"The Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act, by stimulating an increasing flow of trade 
between nations, will contribute strongly to the achievement of this objective. 
Its extension is essential if we are to complete the work we have begun." 

The President" s message met the usual response from the Republican majority in 
Congress to Administration proposals ~ an attack followed by a sidet racking by the 
House Ways and Means Comniittee . "~ " ~ — — — — 

This action was not surprising- 

The Act has been voted upon five times by the Congress. 

Only in the wartime year of l£l»3 did the Republicans fail to vote overwhelmingly 
against the measure. 

Fortunately the Democratic Party had a majority of the Congress during the five 
Congressional votes, so Cordell Hull's statesmanlike program was continued each time. 

That was in the pattern of the Democratic tradition of free trade so that the 
benefitFof a prosperous world trade can be shared by all Americans. 



%-t 



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HISTORY OP THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

By Claude G. Bowers 

(From the Democratic National Convention Book 1936) 

* * * * » 




M (p 



The Democratic Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson, is the only political organi- 
zation that reaches down without a break from the first days of the republic. It was born 
of Jefferson's persuasion of its necessity to defend the republican form of government and 
to make it a democratic, rather than an oligarchic or plutocratic, republic. 

And the first battle of its founders, launched before the party organization had 
been perfected, was to remedy a fatal defect in the Constitution as it came from the 
Constitutional Convention. 

The discussions in the convention disclosed a distinct distrust of the rule of 
the people. Fear of the people impelled the convention to concentrate on the creation of 
a government capable of maintaining order and securing the rights of property. So intent 
were the founders on that necessity that the fundamental law emerged from the convention 
without a single provision for the protection of the rights of man. 



: 



Reading the proposed Constitution in his Legation in Paris, Jefferson was amazed 
nd shocked at this omission of a Bill of Rights. In letters to Washington and Madison, 
ith whom he was in correspondence, he made his objection clear. He had phrased the 
preamble of the Declaration of Independence with the keynote that "governments derive their 
just powers from the consent of the governed," and with the declaration that the primary 
function of a civilized society is to guarantee the people in their "inalienable right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." 

Jefferson was the possessor of wealth; he hated lawlessness; he knew that pro- 
perty has legitimate rights that must be protected in a civilized society, but always he 
stood primarily for the rights of man. 

Instantly his pen moved rapidly over paper in messages to friends and followers 
throughout the country, bearing this ultimatum; "A bill of rights is what any people is 
entitled to against any government, general or particular, and which no just government 
will refuse or rest on inference. 1 * 

Thus under the leadership of Jefferson was launched the movement that put the 
people on notice that liberty and human rights were not guaranteed by their fundamental 
law. Thus, at his instigation, his great lieutenant, James Madison, the "Father of the 
Constitution," presented to the Congress the first ten amendments which constitute the 
Bill of Rights. 

Thus the first victory for liberty and human rights won after the establishment 
of the republic was achieved under the militant leadership of the Jeffersonians. 



X- E 815" 



$1 



TRUMAN FOR PRESIDENT CUJ3 
QF MINNESOTA 



OFFICERS 

Thomas W. Walsh - Chairman 

Stephen H. Harrington - Secretary-Treasurer 

LaMoine M. Dowling - Organization Director 



Copyright 19U8 
Truman for President Club 
of Minnesota 



OFFICES 
830 Minnesota Bldg., St. Paul 1, Minnesota 




X" E 8 ^SeWEY and WARREN 

•Z?c 

^ i4 Capitol Team 









THE 80H|j= 
CONGRESS 
DELIVERS I 



*l<? 



* 

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Here are the FACTS of the 
Republican Congress record on: 



U. S. SPENDING 

PRICES 

COMMUNISM 

VETERANS 

AGRICULTURE 

RECLAMATION 



TAXATION 

INFLATION 

DEFENSE 

HOUSING 

CONTROLS 

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 



A reprint from the Congressional 
Record [Aug. 17, 19481 of the report by 

Representative 

CHARLES A. HALLECK 

(R-lnd.) 

Majority Leader 
House of Representatives 



ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS PAMPHLET MAY BE 
OBTAINED UPON REQUEST THROUGH 

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 
10 




X-E 815 



315 



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Viewpoints : 



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The Political Mill 



ATTM Off DEWEY 

AS FOE OF TE1CHERS 

IS CHILDISH 

by Gould Lincoln 



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as reprinted from 

The Evening Star 

Washington, D. C. 

August 3, 1943 



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Candidate Dewey 

and 

1 "Earl Warren" ! 



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$ The Peoria, 111., Star editori- • 



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* ally takes the measurements * 
jf of the Republican nominees. £ 



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Speech of 



UU WMRM 

Governor of California 



Accepting the Nomination as 

Republican Candidate for Vice 

President of the United States, 

June 25, 1948 






REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 



X-E 315 






T" 



Speech of 



EARL WARREN 

Governor of California 



Accepting the Nomination as 

Republican Candidate for Vice 

President of the United States, 

June 25, 1948 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 



11 
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Speech of 



THOMAS E. DEWEY 

Governor of New York 



Accepting the Nomination as 
Republican Candidate for Pres- 
ident of the United States, 
June 24, 1948 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington 6, D. C. 



Its 






f" 



Speech of 



I 



Governor of New York 



Accepting the Nomination as 
Republican Candidate for Pres- 
ident of the United States, 
June 24, 1948 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington 6, D. C. 



n 

48 



81: 



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Speech of 



I 



Governor of New York 



Accepting the Nomination as 
Republican Candidate for Pres- 
ident of the United States, 
June 24, 1948 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington 6, D. C. 









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X-E 315 



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Speech of 






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Before the Republican National 

Convention, Philadelphia 

June 22, 1948 



■ >*■ 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington 6, D. C. 



» 



X-E 815 



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Speech of 



HERBERT HOOVER 



Before the Republican National 

Convention, Philadelphia 

June 22, 1948 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 



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$ $ 

J Viewpoints: f 

* • 

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Night's 
Work 



by Walter Lippmann 



jf*******************************^ 



One of America's keenest political 
observers tarns the spotlight on Mr. 
Truman's nomination and acceptance. 

(From tie Column, "Today and Tomorrow") 



TN THE ANNALS of the American government 
the scene enacted by Mr. Truman in the middle 
of the night at the close of the Democratic Con- 
vention is unique in its disrespect for the dignity 
of his office and the proprieties of the Constitution. 
It was not pretty to think of the President of the 
United States hanging around backstage for hours, 
waiting to accept a nomination which had not yet 
been tendered to him. Even though he knew that 
the convention had no alternative but to nominate 
him, a decent respect for the forms of democracy 
would have told him that until the delegates had 
voted, they were in principle free to make another 
choice, and that, like Governor Dewey, who waited 
in his hotel, he must not enter the hall. 



But his action when he appeared before the 
delegates was an even more flagrant departure from 
the standards of conduct which the President of 
the United States is in honor bound to observe. 
In the early hours of the morning, in the presence 
of a disorderly partisan meeting, Mr. Truman 



$ Viewpoints : * 

* i 

* • 
Truman 

I On ! 

| I 

| Prices $ 

* i 

* * 



An editorial from The Chicago News, 
July 28, 1948: 

HE ASKS THE LIMITED CONTROL 
HE CALLED FAILURE IN 1946 

Washington, July 26 (AP)— Secretary of Agri- 
culture Brannan today asked farmers to store on 
their farms a "substantial portion" of the big grain 
crops they are producing this year. He said this 
would help MAINTAIN PRICES. . . . 

S PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S Secretary of Ag- 
riculture asked farmers to hold grain off 
the market to maintain prices, Mr. Truman 
sent to Congress his message in which the 
control of prices was the principal topic. 

During the war, we had rationing and price 
control. We had them because military de- 
mands of this country and its allies distorted 
completely the normal pattern of production 
and distribution. At the same time, we had 
a sort of wage control, never as firm as was 
instituted in Canada and Great Britain. 

They "froze" wages simultaneously with 
prices In the beginning and held them both 
relatively tight. 

Since President Truman abandoned the ves- 
tiges of price control by executive order in the 
fall of 1946, two new, great distortions have 
been introduced into our economic life. 

One is the European aid program. The 
other is the new military program adopted 
as a safeguard against the risk of war with 
Russia. 

It is a measure of Truman's abject intellec- 
tual dishonesty that in his message to Congress 



A* 




VOTE FOR AND WITH 




*e sis THE DEWEYS 

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



X-E 815 

^vorc for AND WITH 




THE DEWEYS 



""•'"'"' ««»*„ „„„,„„ 



■?ay 



WASHINGTON, 0. C. 




PENDERGASTRITIS! 



DIAGNOSIS: 

(Patient's condition is critical! 

"I pledge to you thai on next January 20 there 
will begin in Washington the biggest unravelling, 
unsnarling, untangling operation in our Nation's 
history-" 

IGov. Thomas E. Dewey at Oes Moine, la., Sept. 20, 19481 



X-E 815 



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PENDERGASTRITIS! 



DIAGNOSIS: 

tPatient's condition is critical) 

"I pledge to you that on next January 20 there 

will begin in Washington the biggest unravelling, 

unsnarling, untangling operation in our Nation's 

history." 

IGov. Thomaj E. Dewey at Dei Moine, la.. Sept. 20. 19481 



X-E 815 



ti*& 




PENDERGASTRITIS! 



DIAGNOSIS. 

(Patient's condition is critical) 

"I pledge to you that on next January 20 there 
will begin in Washington the biggest unravelling, 
unsnarling, untangling operation in our Nation's 
history." 

(Gov. Thomas E. Dewey a' Dei Moine, la., Sept. 20, 1948) 

X-E 815 



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DEWEY 




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DEWEY 

IN '48 




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SPEAK 

LOUDER THAN 

PROMISES 

to America's Working 
Men and Women! 





Women want 
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING IN GO 

Look what Dewey did in New York state: 

CUT TAXES (saved taxpayers $800,000,000) 

BUILT UP SURPLUSES (Saved tomorrow's tax- 
payers $673,000,000) 

PAID A VETERANS' BONUS OF $400,000,000 
(By 10-year financing — saved taxpay- 
ers $140,000,000 interest) 

INCREASED STATE AID TO LOCAL 
GOVERNMENTS 

REDUCED STATE DEBT $161,000,000! in five 
years (excluding veterans' bonus and 
housing) 

Look what Warren did in California: 

REDUCED TAXES by $422,000,000 

SAVED more than $400,000,000 during war 
years for postwar improvements 

SET ASIDE $75,000,000 for a "rainy day" 
against any possible drop in revenue 

BROADENED unemployment insurance 

RAISED STANDARDS of institutions, mental 
hospitals, prisons and correctional insti- 
tutions 

DEWEY and WARREN Get Things Done! 

Women's Division, Republican National CommittM, Washington, D. C. "2 <^^» 



■ 




r a 1 C 

• IN EDUCATION n 
DEWEY and WARREN Get Things Done! 

Dewey raised New York State teachers to the highest 
level in the world. 

Minimums, which must be as low as $900, now are: 
From $2,000 to $4,300 in smaller communities 
From $2,200 to $4,710 in larger cities except 

New York 
From $2,500 to $5,325 in New York City 

(Minimums depend on length of service and other factors) 

Under Dewey, state aid to school districts is up 80%. 
Dewey's equalization program helps schools that need it 

most. 
Dewey state-financed college housing program helped 

DOUBLE New York State college enrollment. 
5 new vocational institutions take 4,500 students two years 

beyond high school. 
State School of Labor and Industrial Relations going strong 

at Cornell. 

What Warren has done in California: 

Raised teacher salaries to a minimum of $200 a month to 
hold and attract good teachers. 

Appropriated $55,000,000 to assist distressed school dis- 
tricts, help them handle increased enrollments. 

Strengthened teacher pension system with the help of a 
$30,000,000 state appropriation. 

Enabled small school districts to join forces and give better 
service to students. 

Raised money for the deferred State university building 
program. 

Created facilities for teaching specialized subjects (forestry, 
veterinary science, etc.) to furnish specialists for Cali- 
fornia's economy. 

DEWEY and WARREN Get Things Done! 

Women's Division, Republican National Committee, Washington, D. C. 72 ^H^ 



X-E 815 



IN HOUSING 






•to 



Dewey and Warren Get Things Bone! n 

Here's what Dewey did in New York: 

Enacted a law to hold down rents. New York was the only 
state with a rent-control law ready to go into effect 
. . . automatically . . . the moment OPA quit. 
(Another example of Dewey foresight and plan- 
ning.) 

Guided New York's active slum clearance and housing 
projects by: 

Arranging for loans of more than $277,000,000 for 42 public 
housing projects in a $435,000,000 program. 

Made cash payments up to $13,000,000 a year to maintain 
rents as low as $7 per room per month including hot water, 
gas and electricity. 

Gave certain state and municipal tax exemptions for multiple 
housing to veterans. 

Provided homes for 160,000 otherwise doomed to the slums. 
Set up the nation's first veterans' emergency housing plan . . . 
a model used by other states. 

Made available apartments for veteran and college housing for 
veterans and their families totaling 61,280. 

Here's what Warren did in California: 

Bought surplus building materials from government and 
sold them at cost to veterans for home construction. 

Bought temporary rental housing in cooperation with gov- 
ernmental agencies. 

Supplemented insufficient federal funds by $4,500,000. 

Enlarged California plans for lending money to veterans to 
buy farms and homes. 

DEWEY and WARREN Get Things Done! 



Wom.n's Division, Republican National CommitlM, Wa»hington, D. C. 



72' 






WANTED 



M 



WOMEN FOR IMPORTANT POSITIONS 

WHEN REPUBLICAN PARTY TAKES OVER 
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN JANUARY 48 

Only qualified applicant* considered. We offer you hard work, 
long hours; we expect your best efforts. 

OUR RECORD on Recognition of Women Speaks for itself. As 
of September 15, 1948: 

1 Republican woman elected to full six-year term in Senate. 
4 of 7 women in Congress are Republicans. 

11 of 19 women in major state elective positions are Republicans. 
155 of the 211 women in state legislatures are Republicans. 

44 of the 47 women in high state appointive posts were appointed 

• by Republican Governors. 
The Assistant Chairman of the Republican National Committee 
is a woman. 

The first Associate Campaign Manager of a Presidential campaign 
is a Republican woman. 

2 of the 4 vice chairmen of the Republican National Committee 
are women. 

The Secretary of the Republican National Committee is a woman. 
All subcommittees of the Republican National Committee are com- 
posed of an equal number of men and women. 

In the 1948 Republican Convention: 

For the First Time: A woman was Secretary. 

A woman was a Committee Chairman (Permanent 

Organization) . 

A woman was chairman of a sub-committee (Labor 

and Social Welfare) of Resolutions Committee. 

A woman made the nominating speech for a Presi- 
dential candidate. 

Five women made formal addresses. 
For tht Second Time: Women served on Resolutions Committee on equal 

basis with men. 

Women served as vice chairman and secretary of 

Resolutions Committee. 

WOMEN URGENTLY NEEDED TO HELP BUILD 
A STRONG, SOUND, SOLVENT AMERICA! 

VOTE REPUBLICAN! 

Kcpubltcta National Committee, Washington, D. C. "■*•*• 



X-E U15 $IC 

■7.15 Ip^ i\ 

THE 1948 PLATFORM OF 

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Adopted by 
Republican National Convention 
June 23, 1948, Philadelphia. Pa. 






Distributed by 

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

1337 Connecticut Avenue 

Washington 6, D. C. 



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#37 



-7 



15 




n 

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« « ■« « !■» m, 



Autumn 1948 

Including a Condensed History of the Republican Party 



WUWICAN NATIONAL FINANCE COMMfTTH 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE, NORHWEST 

W AS HIN GTON 6, 0. C 



• - 7 iS 



m n M38 




THE warren: 



X-E 315 

... an article from 



W 



CAMPUS 




PARADE 



The National College Magazine 



October issue 



highlighting 

the aims and 

accomplishments 

of the 



YOUNG 
REPUBLICAN 
NATIONAL 
FEDERATION 







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48 



WOllfN'S DIVISION- 



X-E 815 



'.7ASHIKGTCH, D.C., 1337 Connecticut Avenue — October 25, 1943 



REPUBLICAN I7QIEN 
J LEAD IS CONGRESS 



Republicans will have the largest representation 
of women in the 81st Congress, beginning 
January 3rd. 



Already elected to the Senate (September 13th) is 
Mrs. Margaret Chase Smith, Republican of L'aine. She is the first Republican 
woman elected to a full six-year term in the Senate. She is nov/ concluding 
eight years of service in the House of Representatives. Her elevation to the 
Senate placed her as the 5th woman Senator in American history. 



House: 



Share are five Republican women candidates for the 



Incumbents, seeding reelection: 

Mrs, Edith 1-Icurse Rogers , Massachusetts, (5th Dis'fc) 
Has no opponent. 
Member of House since 1925. 
Chairman of House Veterans Affairs Committee. 

Mrs* Trances ?. Bolton , Ohio (22d List.) 
Member of House since 1940* 
Only woman member elected from Ohio. 
Member of House Foreign Affairs Committee. 

Mrs. Katharine St. C-aorge , New York (29th Dist.) 

Member of House since 1946. 

Member of House Post Office and Civil Service 

Committees. 

Hew Candidates: 
Mrs. Cecil Harden , Indiana (6th Diet.) 
President, County Welfare Board since 1943. 
Republican National Commit teewoman since 1944. 

Miss Caraille Geneau , Florida (2d Dist.) 
School teacher and Assistant Supervisor of 

Education. 




*7&e 'tyouny ^efio&lictui 









Dewey- Warren 
Campaign Special 



No. 1 



1337 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Sept. 22, 1948 



CONSOLIDATED BALANCE 
SHEET 

Year Ended December 31st, 1947 

Population of the United States 135,000,000 

People 65 years or older 37,000,000 

Balance left to do the work 98,000,000 

People 21 years or younger 54,000,000 

Balance left to do the work 44,000,000 

People working for the Government 21,000,000 

Balance left to do the work 23,000,000 

People in the Armed Services 10,000,000 

Balance left to do the work 13,000,000 

People in State and City offices 1 2,800,000 

Balance left to do the work 200,000 

People in Hospitals, 

Insane Asylums 1 26,000 

Balance left to do the work 74,000 

Bums and others who won't work 62,000 

Balance left to do the work 12,000 

Persons in Jail 11,998 

Balance left to do the work 2 

TWO — YOU AND I 

Cand you'd better get a wiggle on — I'm getting 
ired of running this country alone. 

This double-edged 'message' was printed 
on the back of invitations to the San Francisco 
Young Republicans "Dewey-Warren Kick-Off 
Rally." Over 850 young people listened to 
luminaries such as George Murphy, Hedda 
Hopper, Adela Rogers St. John, and Iva Kover- 
man, while lee Bowman MC'ed and Carle- 
ton Ackley's orchestra set the tempo for 
rally and dancing. This was one of the 
largest gatherings of young people for a polit- 
ical meeting that San Francisco has ever wit- 
nessed. This September 15th affair also marked 
the official rebirth of San Francisco Young Re- 
publicans as one of the most ambitious clubs 
in the country. 



BRAIN WAVES ARE FINE BUT 

NEWS COMES BEST BY MAIL 

We've got to get the Young Republican light from under the bushel basket. 
Properly plug the two P's of Campaign success: 

PLANNING AND PUBLICITY 

Have your program planned in detail for the next five weeks of "Hot War" 
on the political front. Include service with your Senior organization, get people 
registered and to the polls, coordinate with your state and national Young 
Republicans, work with the Volunteer Dewey-Warren Clubs and the Women's 
Dewey-Warren Campaign Centers, (your participation in these groups as members 
of your local Young Republican Club is one of 



CATCH THAT TRAIN ! ! ! 

The Dewey-Warren Trains are two that 
you can't afford to miss. One of the most 
spectacular things in a Presidential cam- 
paign is the excitement and purpose and 
glamour of the candidates trains. Each stop 
brings the candidate that much closer to the 
people whom he seeks to represent. On the 
Dewey-Warren Trains Young Republicans 
are getting the chance to meet the next 
President and Vice President and their 
retinue personally. 

Young Republicans should contact their 
senior leaders immediately in connection 
with their part in the affair — be it a welcome 
caravan, a reception for Virginia Warren, a 
meeting of your representative with the 
candidates. 

This is one of the greatest thrills in a 
campaign so get your wheels spinning so 
that that Train Stop will really mean some- 
thing to your club. 



YOURS FOR THE ASKING 

Many are wondering what the 1948 Campaign twists will be. There will be an abundance 
of material that will assure you of the physical equipment to campaign successfully. But first, you've 
got to know what it is. Second, you've got to get it. Third, you've got to <put it to work. 

YOUNG REPUBLICAN MATERIAL — HOT OFF THE PRESS 
National (Limited supplies furnished by Federation Headquarters — you can purchase more) 

1. Organization Handbook — Has worked with 2,400 clubs to date. 

2. Campaign Handbook — Guide to Campaign action techniques. 

3. "You — The First Voter" — To answer the two big questions of the 10,000,000 First Voters 
— Why Vote? and Why Vote Republican? 

4. Dewey-Warren Victory Stamp — Get these on millions of Republican letters in October 
and people from coast to coast will be doubly aware of two things: Dewey-Warren 
Victory and YR activity. 

5. Campus Campaign Material (A big part of our Campaign New look). 

a. "The Republican Party on the Campus" — Striking organizational booklet for college clubs. 

b. "What Gives" — Eye-catching "throw-away" for campus use. 

c. "Campus Republican" — Newspaper for YR college news and pictures. 

6. "Teenage Republican" — These youngsters can get a wardful of votes and here's how. 

7. Speakers' Research and Source material, 
late 

1. Almost every state and local club has a YR publication and material of its own. 

N.B. — Individual clubs should be able to raise funds for material such ai: Newsletters, publicity 
for their own meetings, posters for the club, etc. 
SENIOR PARTY MATERIAL— 

Your State Chairmen have been given a list of suppliers of material which can be used in 
filling your needs rapidly. 



the best ways of building up your club's service 
record), hold rallies, and plan a big victory 
celebration. 

Get this! 

When you do something — anything — 

ISSUE A NEWS RELEASE 

Complete with glossy photos, if possible. 

Get them regularly into the hands of your 

local papers, your state Young Republican 

Headquarters, National Federation Headquarters, 

and Senior Party Leaders. 

An undistributed piece of timely news is 
about the same worth as a stitch not taken in 
time. 

So Plan — make if click 
Publicize — make if known. 



MESSAGE FROM YOUR 
CHAIRMAN 

By RALPH E. BECKER 

This is the first of five weekly Victory- 
Grams that will be issued from the Federa- 
tion's Campaign Headquarters. 

They will post you on the Dewey-Warren 
Victory Drive as it affects the Young Repub- 
licans,- happenings from the national level) 
and effective ideas, programs and activities 
of the state and local clubs. 

Most important, this will let you know 
what we can do for you and what you can 
do for us. 

Our job, at the Headquarters, is in direct 
proportion to your contribution to your 
national organization. That is why I hove 
consistently urged you to send us evidence 
of your labors and progress. The credit is 
yours, not ours. We want to see that you 
receive it in a way that will benefit not only 
you but all Young Republicans as well. 

We are all working at headquarters as a 
team with no prima donnas or stars. From 
Herb Brownell, Hugh Scott, Judy Weis on 
down to the auxiliary groups, the motto is 
"all for one and one for all." 

The YRs have th^ir important role to play. 

Let's perform like seasoned troupers in 
every act. There is no job too small, no 
task too large. 

There are only five weeks to go, so 



LET'S GO! 



'2 




7^e ^r<w*^ 'RefiutilvHt #^ 





Dewey- Warren 

Campaign Special 



No. 2 



1337 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Sept. 29, 1948 



SEAL THE VICTORY! 

The campaign is getting into full swing and the word is 
spreading from coast to coast about the Dewey-Warren 
Victory Stamp. Several promotional ideas have come to 
headquarters showing how to get the most good out of the 
stamp. Some may help you with your plans. With that 
thought in mind several are listed below: 

(1) Arrange for a meeting with some of the 
leading Republicans of your community and pre- 
sent them with the stamps on behalf of the 
Young Republicans. There is a real news 




story in this so make sure that reporters and 
photographers are present at the ceremony. 

(2) Advise all the Republican auxiliary 
groups about the stamp. Have them use it on 
all their mail. Approximately 7 people see and 
handle each letter that goes through the mail. 

(3) Get your local newspapers who are 
favorable to the Republican cause to print a 
reproduction and also stick it on their mailings. 

(4) Have local newspapers promote a 
"Young Republican Day" and ask all local 
merchants to cooperate this one day by pasting 
stamps on all packages, wrappings, etc. 

(5) Hold local contests awarding prizes for 
the most creative use of the stamps, such as 
lamp shade designs. Resulting publicity should 
be good. 

(6) Contact all candidates and party leaders 
about their purchasing a supply for their per- 
sonal use. 

(7) Talk to your friends and family about it. 
Have them use it on all their personal corre- 
spondence. 

131 YOU USE IT! 

Order Your Own Supply From the American 
Sank Note Company, 70 Broad Street, New 
York 4, New York. 

i Price Per Thousand: In tots of: 

S3. 00 1,000 

$2.75 ............... ...... 10,000 

32. 50 25,000 

$2.00 50.000 

Si. 50 . 100.000 



MESSAGE FROM YOUR 
CO-CHAIRMAN 

By RUTH S. STOCKTON 

During the last sixteen years governmental 
activity has become more and more associated 
with what might be termed "basic" to the Amer- 
ican way of life — the home and the welfare 
of the family. Thus, women have a stake in 
this year's Presidential campaign. They have 
an obligation to participate in politics along 
with men. By doing this they will insure that 
what affects them will be managed efficiently 
and economically. 

The Young Republican National Federation 
is the existing medium through which you can 
begin. It will also give you an opportunity 
to become acquainted and work with the various 
auxiliaries of the Republican party, such as the 
Women's Federation and other activities of 
young women with whom we are closely asso- 
ciated. 

This year the Republican Party offers to the 
Nation two great teoders in Governors Thomas 
E. Dewey and Earl Warren. They have a record 
which promises not only cooperation, but a full 
partnership with women in the councils of the 
Party. 

In closing, let me wish you all success in our 
great crusade for free and better government. 



BULLETINS FROM THE STATES 

DEWEY-WARREN DAY IN NEW YORK 

The Young Republicans in New York have 
organized on extensive campaign program 
which will consist of a Dewey-Warren Day. It 
will lake place on October 15th. U. S. Senator 
Irving Ives will be the principal speaker on a 
state-wide radio hook-up. 

This is an idea that can be set up in every 
state in the Union. We will be glad to assist 
you in your plans if you will only let us know. 



ESSAY CONTEST ON DEWEY 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GET ON THE BEAM! 

Many states have their plans set with a First-Voters program. In New 
York, for example, the Young Republicans have arranged for a special 
state-wide First Voters Day. Minnesota will be holding a First Voters 
rally for Virginia Warren. Every state has a job to do in respect to this 
matter. To supplement our First Voters pamphlet and to assist you in your 
plans, we are re-printing below parts of our new Campaign Handbook 
pertaining to First Voters. There is no limit to what you can do. 

FIRST VOTERS PROGRAM 

"First voters are (1) young people who have 
recently arrived at the age of 21, or (2) recently 
naturalized citizens, or (3) people young and 
old who for one reason or another have never 
voted. The first problem is to find who the first 
voters are in a particular area prior to and after 
registration." 

"Prior to registration there are various 
methods of finding out who the first voters 
are. Inquire into the files of the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles, the Bureau of Vital Statistics, 
etc. Colleges and high schools may furnish the 
names of graduates, and the clerk of the 
nearest Federal Court will furnish the names 
of recently naturalized citizens. College Young 
Republican Clubs can be particularly effective in 
the campus area. Use your ingenuity." 

"Subsequent to registration the Precinct 
Official, the County Clerk or appropriate State 
Official will usually provide a list of all First 
Voters who have registered." 

"CANVASS THEM: 

The initial step is the canvassing of all 
First Voters, first to persuade them to register, 
and then to vote Republican. Canvassing 
may be done through the Canvassing Division 
or the First Voters Division, or both. First Voters 
Literature will be provided by the Federation in 
Washington for use by Canvasers." 

"In this connection. First Voters literature 
will be provided by the Federotion in Wash- 
ington for use by Canvassers with First Voters." 
"HOLD FIRST VOTER RALLIES: 

Holding at least one First Voter Rally is 
very effective. However, care must be taken 
to stage the rally on a quality basis. Nothing 
will drive First Voters away from a political 
party quicker % lhan poor quality speeches or 
inferior personnel, or a haphazardly run meet- 
ing. At each First Voter Rally at least one 
prominent figure should address the rally. A 
considerable portion of time should be devoted 
to good entertainment, with a youthful atmos- 
phere. Devote the rest of the lime to having 
your group get to know the First Voters per- 
sonally, and be sure to give each First Voter a 
chance to shake hands with every candidate." 



IN 



The New Hampshire State Federation of 
Ycuig Republican Clubs has announced that it 
will sponsor an essay contest on "Why I Am 
Going to Vote for Dewey." The contest will 
run until Oct ber 17th. Three prizes of $100, 
S50 and '" be awarded. Rules of :ho 



contest limit essays to not more than 200 words. 
BABY SITTERS IN ILLINOIS 
To cooperate aid assist djring school days 
while baby sitters are not readily available, 
the Young Republicans of Illinois ire offering 
this service free 



•-72 




*7&e tyauay, IQefcuUy 





Dewey-Warren 



Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 




WORK! 

DAYS 



11 

"5fi 



^3 




Oct. II, 1948 



WORK! WORK! 

ILL VICTORY 



YOUNG REPUBLICAN MATERIAL 



It's better to, have too much than too little, 
your work write direct to the suppliers listed below, 
now so advise the suppliers to use AIR PARCEL POST 
since time is so short. 



In 
The 
and 



order to 
mails are 
SPECIAL 



T. Le- 
tt ii.it (lives 



Supplier * 

' ■ ■ irtone Press 
JOu-l M Street, AAV. 
Washington, '- 1 - C 



In Lots of 



thousnnd 
thousand 



expedite 

crowded 

DELIVERY 



Price 
Per 1.000 

DO 
h.8U 



Republican 
1 ipnign Handbook 


Kaiiiniaiin Pn 

11. -,x r Street, X.W. 

Washington, 1). C. 


1 
10 


aud 
ii:- tisand 


oo.oo 

80.00 


reen-Age Republican 


K,r::mann Press 
U-'N U Street. N.W. 
hington, 1). C. 


1 

5 

over 5 


'!i, : .and 

thousand 
tho i Jand 


17.00 
'■.'•5 


1- ir^t \ nters Pamphlet 


\ i ional !■' ii i' r. 
Ml 11th Street. N.W. 
Washington, 1). C. 


1 
10 


thousand 

thousand 


7.110 
i.tiO 


Republican Party on 
The Campua 


Kaufm arm Pr, .* 
1428 V Street. X.W. 
hington, D. C. 


5 


thousand 


' 


Dewey Speaks to \ 


Kuufmann Press .. 
1428 V Street. X.W. 
Washington, D. C. 


10 
JO 
50 


ill; .r. .and 

thousand 

and 




111. ,13 
S.2S 


Warren Victory 
Stamp 


American Bank Xote Company 

70 llroad Street 
Vew York 1. X. Y. 


1 

10 
25 

50 
•ii<l 


thousand 

thousand 
thousand 
thousand 
th, in and 


1.00 
_'.75 
J. 50 
.'.OO 
1.50 


'f'he Campus Republican 
(College Newspaper) 


Thomas Adams K iMvis 

US 11th Street. S.W. 
Washington, D. C. 


1 
1 


thousand 

over 

thousand 


.'1.70 
x.70 



g Republican 
f Organization I [andbook 



. nal Republic Printers 

; 11 11th 'Street. X.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



' 



BULLETINS FROM THE STATES 



TORCHLIGHT PARADE IN TEXAS 
Young Republicans in San Antonio, Texas, 
revived the festive atmosphere of the old-time 
political torchlight parades on October 1st. 
Between 600 and 700 marchers carrying signs, 
Dewey- Warren buttons and balloons, made for 
an efl •-■ a ; underlined by a 

serious note urging the election of Governors 
Dewey end Worr^n, 

SAN DIEGO YRS INVITE TRUMAN TO RETIRE 
When the Truman campaign train 
through San Diego last week, Ihe Young Re- 
publicans greeted the Democrat candidate with 
a large sign. It <ead; "Northern San Diego 
County Young Republicans Invite President Tru- 



man to retire here in God's country 
20, 1949. '" 



January 



MERRY-GO-ROUND IN NEW JERSEY 
TO ENCOURAGE VOTING 

Tf-'e Young Republicans of New Jersey u:ed 
a Merry-Go-Round io •ncourage voters to reg- 
ler. They used the slogan, "Baby- Sitters I 
No Problem!" The stunt vas designed to 
tain children while their mothers went to the 
polls 'o register for the coming election in 
November, This is just another effective idea 
that con be put into operation in your state 
<vhen election day rolls around. But remymber 
it takes planning — so get on ihe ball without 
d^lay. 



DEWEY WILL SPEAK 
TO YOUR CLUB 

The recording of Governor Dewey's 17 minute 
address to the Young Republican National Federa- 
tion in Albany, New York, on August 11, 1948, 
has fust been distributed to your Young Republican 
State Chairman. CONTACT HIM FOR A COPY. 

This speech has a particular appeal to youth, 
and is something which every Young Republican 
should have the privilege of hearing. 

Ingenuity will produce plenty of local tie-ins. 
Use it as a personal address to your Club at any 
meeting or rally associating your club and local 
candidates with the next President of the United 
States; a First Voters rally; or a special program for 
your local radio station. For example: advertise in 
your local papers that "Governor Dewey will speak 
to youth at 6:30 over station XYZ." 



MESSAGE FROM YOUR CHAIRMAN 

By RALPH E. BECKER 

In the brief time between now and "E" Day, 
all Young Republicans have a real opportunity 
to capture the admiration and respect of every- 
one in the party. 

There is no limit to what can be done to 
help in the Senate and Congressional campaigns 
as welt as in the Presidential race. Every 
registered Republican should be contacted well 
in advance of November 2nd, and reminded of 
his duty to vote. 

The efection of a Republican Congress is vital- 
ly necessary io corry cut the program of our 
great team captains, Governors Thomas E. Dewey 
and Earl Warren. This will insure a harmonious 
administration of our national ctlairs 
next four years. It will mad-: the oeginninq 
of a crystal c!°or pol'cy with a definife line ~f 
r« sponsibiiity available for complete Inspection 
by all Americans. 

The American people need and are entitled 
♦o^a harmonious admin titration. Oo your shore. 



"2 




*7& tyocuty 




Dewey-Warren m a 

Campaign Special iNO. t 



1337 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Oct. 18, 1948 



UNITED WE WIN 



MESSAGE FROM 
YOUR CHAIRMAN 

By RALPH I. BECKER 

By the time this issue of the Victory-Gram 
reaches you Election Day will be almost a 
thing of the past. For months you have been 
preparing for this day, which is all-important 
on every citizen's calendar. 

November 2nd of this year will truly be one 
>f the most memorable in our country's history. 
This is true because with the election of a 
Republican President, our country will be em- 
barking upon a new era wherein the dignity 
of the individual will once more be respected. 

The Young Republicans throughout the entire 
nation have good cause to be proud of the part 
which they have played in this great crusade 
to promote and protect their future security. 

I want to take this opportunity to pay tribute 
to the fine job which you already have done; 
I am sure that you are well organized for the 
Final Push and that you will be ready to assist 
in whatever task presents itself on Election Day. 

When the new year begins, the future course 
of our country wiil be in the firm and able hands 
of Governors Dewey and Warren. Our Fed- 
eration will have earned the admiration and 
the respect of everyone for its part in the suc- 
cess of this crusade to return the government 
to the people under a Republican Administration. 

Thanks a million for your courageous, tal- 
ented, and generous cooperation. 



PLAN A VICTORY CELEBRATION 

Many Clubs already have extensive plans 
for a huge victory celebration. This appears 
to be an exceptionally good idea inasmuch as 
it wilt afford you an opportunity to recognize 
those who have contributed to our cause. 
Furthermore, it will also give you an oppor- 
tunity to announce your program for the com- 
ing year. REMEMBER, YOUR OBJECTIVE 
HOULD BE GEARED TO A YEAR ROUND OP- 
ERATION, WHICH IS ONE OF THE MAIN 
CRITERIA OF SUCCESS IN ANY POLITICAL 
ORGANIZATION. 



VICTORY CHECK-UP! 

All plans for Election Day should now be complete. Nothing is more thrilling 
than the challenge of working together as smoothly-functioning teams on the day 
when people across the land will be exercising their right of franchise. How- 
ever, don't overlook the psychology of making this memorable occasion fun and 
exciting. 

Young Republicans can be of great assistance in this final drive. In 
certain areas, many elections may turn on the effectiveness of your contribution. 
The following items should not be overlooked: 



I. ELECTION LAWS: This is a MUST for all 
Young Republicans. You should be able to cite 
accurately and simply the local rules on all 
aspects of voting. 

II. DISTRIBUTION OF SAMPLE BALLOTS: If 

you do your job here no votes will be lost by 
incorrect marking. Your senior party organi- 
zation will undoubtedly need assistance in get- 
ting these properly distributed to all registered 
Republican voters. 

III. POLL WATCHING: People assigned to 
this task should be thoroughly trained in ad- 
vance and familiar with all phases of the law 
relative to registration and voting. Moreover, 
it is important that they be personally ac- 
quainted with most of the voters in the election 
district or precinct. 

IV. TELEPHONE CANVASS: This is a highly 
effective method of getting voters to the polls. 
However, it is a big operation and requires lots 
of work and planning. The following sugges- 
tions should prove helpful in this phase of your 
election day activities: 

1. Make up a telephone canvass tally 
sheet. Be sure to: 

a. List the polling address. 

b. Limit number of names of Repub- 
lican voters to each canvasser. 

c. Make instructions available to 
the canvasser on how to "break 
the ice," and handle voters over 
the telephone. 

2. Begin work at noon and continue 
until the polls close. 

" For further amplification of these in- 



structions, see Young Republican Cam- 
paign Handbook, pages 16-19. 

V. TRANSPORTATION: This phase of your 
Election Day activities should begin early in the 
day when the polls open. It may prove 
helpful to your cause to provide baby sitters 
during the voters' absence from home. 

VI. DOUBTFUL AREAS: Check with Senior 
Leaders in your Ward and Precinct. Offer your 
services. Obtain a list of the families. Go over 
this list with the Young Republican leaders in 
an effort to determine if any member knows 
them and will talk to them about the Republican 
cause and our candidates. 

VII. HEADQUARTERS: Do not overlook the 
effectiveness of having refreshments on hand 
during the day. Provide complete and up-to- 
date information there on all Republican can- 
didates and on the voting laws which can be 
dispersed to any and all callers. Also, make 
arrangements for tabulating and reporting the 
returns. This develops a camaraderie that is 
vital to the success of your local program. 




EVERY VOTE COUNTS - Vote! Vote! Vote! 



»72 



NEWS RELEASE 



C 



X-E 815 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 
to 



\\ 



FOR RELEASE 



MGRNIBO N3WSP.APERS 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 19^8 



Governor Thomas 3. Dewey will address a mass meeting 
in the Chicago Stadium on the evening of October 26th, it 
was announced today by Herbert Brcwnell, Jr., Dewey-Warren 
Campaign Manager. 

The Republican Presidential Candidate will be speaking 
in one of the largest auditoriums in the Middle 'Test, and one 
which has been the scene of several national Conventions of 
both parties in recent years. Additional details concerning 
this meeting will be announced later. 






oo 



NEWS RELEASE 



# 815 



Republican National Committee 

11 
U 
46 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 




I-X3R RELEASE 



Immediate 
Oct. 25, 1948 



$% 



Stars in many sports will tie featured on the Dewey- Warren Sports Parade, a 
special "broadcast to "be heard over the BBC network Tuesday from 8:00 to 8:30 P.M. 

Highlighting the list of stars who are supporting the Dewey-Warren team 
will be Joe Louis, Jack Dempsey, Willie Turnesa, "Babe" Didrickson, Dick Button, 
Sid Luckman, Fritz Crisler, "Rabbit" Maranville and Jinx Falkenburg. 

Col. Sdward P. F. Eagan, Chairman of the Hew York State Athletic Commission, 
will act as host to the stars for the evening and Ted Husing, famed sportscaster, 
will interview the stars. 

Also appearing on the program will be Bob "Believe It Or Not" Ripley and 
Bob Considine, noted sports columnist. Ripley will relate some famous "believe it 
or nots" about sports and Considine will deliver sports anecdotes. 

The program will be sponsored by the Uew York State Dewey-Warren Citizens 
Committee. 



J*******************!!, 



Republican National Committee 



NEWS RELEASE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6, 



±> 315 



Pn 11 

Iff 



FOR RELEASE 

?:C0 PM. 3ST 

Tuesday, Oct.. 26, 1948 



STATmSST 3Y HERBERT BR0 T, 7!T-<!LL,JR«,. CAMPAIGN HS8AGRR 
FOR TH3 DS'WT-WAHHSH TICKET. 



It is fortunate for the Nation that the American people have less than a 
week more during which they must submit to demonstrations of Pendergast ward 
politics such as those indulged in by Mr. Truman at Chicago last night and at 
Cleveland tonight. It is a humiliating spectacle, and it has -ootentialities 
of serious damage to our national prestige abroad. 

The Democrat candidate's effort to picture himself as an outstanding cham-oion 
of human rights is completely ridiculous when his words are contrasted with his 
record. He had a chance once to demonstrate his belief in human rights - on 
August 25, 1942 when the Senate was considering a Republican amendment to the 
soldier vote bill,, the amendment being a tiro-nosal to prohibit the collection of 
poll taxes as a prerequisite to voting by men in the armed services. The then 
Senator from Missouri^ Mr. Truman, voted a ainst that amendment. So did his 
present running-mate, Senator Alben W, Barkley, of Kentucky. 

Mr. Truman's record on this, and numerous othef issues, demonstrates ho\-r much 
importance can be attached to his words, 

I was highly amused at Mr. Truman's statement: "Tonight I want to let you in 
on a secret, 'ife have the Republicans on the run." 

That is certainly the best-keot secret in all history, 



* * * * 



Republican Nation 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 



inn s 

xjvL, cb>ft 



NEWS RELEASE 



t^IITTEE 

8 



WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



(^ 315 

Z<?5" FOR RELEASE 



tfVfc 



Afternoon papers 
October 27, 1943 



Mrs. Hiram C. Houghton, Jr., of Hed Oak, Iowa, first vice president of 
the General Federation of Somen's Clubs, and a memher of the Iowa State 
Board of Education, today made known her endorsement of the Dewey-Warren 
Ticket. 

In a statement issued in Washington through Mrs. Charles W. Weis, Jr., 
Associate Campaign Manager of the Dewey-Warren Ticket, Mrs. Houghton said: 

"With great enthusiasm, I am supporting the Dewey-Warren Ticket in the 
coming Election, as I am highly impressed with the outstanding records of 
Doth Governor Dewey and Governor Warren. They are firmly imbued with 
American principles. Their demonstrated capacities for administration will 
assure fair, constructive leadership at Fashington in foreign affairs, in 
momentous domestic problems concerning the solvency of our government, the 
welfare of our homes, and especially the education and future of America's 
children. Under Governor Dewey and Governor Warren, there will he restoration 
of confidence, and revitalized courage. We will feel mere secure, and 
America will go forward in prosperity and happiness. This will mean an 
enrichment of the home life of all*" 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



815 
<?5" 



FOR RELEAS 




Morning Papers 

Thursday, October 28, 1948 

Margaret Culkin Banning, popular magazine writer, radio speaker and 
widely known interpreter of world affairs, today declared her enthusiastic 
support for the election of the Dewey-Warren Ticket. 

In a statement issued through Mrs. Robert W. Macauley, Assistant Chairman 
of the Republican National Committee, Mrs. Banning said: 

"Disturbed and earnest men and women ask me continually what they personally 
can do to work for peace* In all sincerity I answer that the November 
elections are the best hope we have for peace. The basic material for a 
peaceful world is a strong and stable United States of ^merica. Working for and 
voting for men and women who can strengthen and stabilize this country is 
directly working for peace. 

"It is completely logical and absolutely necessary to elect the Republican 
Ticket, Thomas E. Dewey and Earl Warren, if we want a strengthened and 
stabilized United States. The candidates of the other parties could and would 
only increase the terrible confusion and growing divisions in this country and 
the world, 

"In Eurapet where I have recently been, the importance and responsibility 

of the United States to world stability was obvious everywhere. If we are 

sound and firm in America, that soundness and firmness will be reflected in 

other countries. They want in Europe to know what our leadership for the 

next years will be, if our leaders truly believe that democracy as it is 

practised in this country can v/ork, if our leaders will be men who have been 

proved competent in administration of public affairs. 

"The best encouragement the world can possibly have at the moment, as well 
as the best answer to those who are unable or unwilling to support American 
democracy, is to elect, by an overwhelming unarguable majority Mr. Dewey and 
Mr. Warren. ***** 



X-E 815 

■^5 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVE 
WASHINGTON 6 

lO 



If 11 



,«fy... 1 1 48 



FOR RELEASE 



*« 



Kerning 2fevspape»s # 
Thursday, Sept, 16,1948 
Hail* Be lease *xOC JM.3D? 
He dne sday,Se«t , 15,1943 



Herbert Browne 11, Jr, # Dewey -Vayre* faapalcft Xaaagerc today announced the 
following additional stops la few met Tfee*M X« Xfevey's campaign itinerary! 
Tuesday, September 28 • 

Wednesday, September 29 e 

Thursday, September 30 ' ' ■* 

Friday, October 1 « 



ItetS Mdrest tt Spokane, Washington 
Sight Address at Missoula, Montana 

fftoa Address at Ealena, Montana 
fight Address at Great Falls, Montana 

Soon Address at Pocatella, Idaho 
flight Address at Salt Lake City, Utah 

Wight Address at Cheyenne, Wyoming 



Further details of the Goternor^s schedule on his transcontinental tour, 
including rear platform appearances and the times of major radio addresses, will 
be announced later. 



* • * m 



Republican Natk wal 



BeaSMEXTEE 

T 



Nr utp - " - !) ri r » C C ,sa7 CONNECTICUT *v«n« 

t W U KtLtAot WASHINGTON 6, D. C? • ,. »« 

4« 



X<- 



8l& . , 

^^g FOR RELKAMK ; / 5/ 

v^t-^juits' Division 



For MOHKIOT newspapers 
Release Eo. 31 Monday. Oct. 35. 1948 



Statements by seven prominent r-onen leaders In the Republican 
7eterans' organization giving their reasons for supporting Dewey and .'arren 
were made public today by Campaign Chairman Herbert '3ro"nell, Jr., following 
conferences -ith Veterans' Chairman Harry ./. Colmery and 1,'rs. Norton H. Pearl 
of Detroit, chairman of the .'omen's Section. 

As reported to national head ouar tors, their support of the 
Republican candidates is bared on a desire to preserve American orinciples, 
bring dynamic leadership to the national government, strengthen the prospect 
for peace, maintain the two-narty system, end because of the personalities 
and broad experience of the t"0 candidates. 

3xcept for Krs. t'ann, a past national President of the V. J. T. 
ladles' Auxiliary, each of the "somen quoted Is a past national President of 
the American Legion Auxiliary, as is Mrs, Pearl. 
The statements follows 

Mrs. A. J. I.'athebat 

1545 oroadway 

Alameda, California - "In the coming election America will 
choose her path for the future. Therefore it is imperative that the next 
Administration in "Veshington be guided by men of ability, Integrity, courage 
end vision. Both 'rovernors' Dewey and "arren have proved they possess these 
ouplitles. Having a deep interest in the -elfare of my country, I shall vig- 
orously support and recommend to you these two outstanding Governors for the 
highest offices attainable. .'e can have complete confidence that these two 
virile Americans will guide up through the challenging years hist ahead." 

Un, Tranklin Lee bishop 

3544 A Street 

San Diego 3, California (formerly of Massachusetts) - "1 am 
sunnortlng the Dewey- Varrpn tie'eet because I em first an American. That to 
me is a sacred gift and trust. It -pes beyond all thoughts of nartisanship. 
If each individual voter In theoe United States could but meet Governor Dewey 
personally they would. I know, say for a certainty, as I do - 'Here is a roan 
I can trust this United States of nine to lead and guard, to hold in trust in 
all the tine of his leadership, -ithout fear of failure, as a dweller in the 
State of California for the r>ast 4 years, I have Ven near also to Governor 
"arren's successes, and h.-ive seen the great admiration in which he is held by 
the people who taoi him Intimately. Our country and the basic principles on 
-Men it is founded will be secure in the leadership of Governor Dewey and 
Governor ".Vrren". 

- Page 1 » 



Republican n atiwhwii j Committee 



37 CONNECTCUT AVENUE 



N L W O nELcAoE WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 

xT7I3 •♦" - MS * 

V^T^RaNS' DIVISION **>!« RELEASE 



Release Fo. 19 Por newspapers of STOTDaY. 

Oct. 24, 1948 



.'omen prominent In veterans' affairs, conmunlty sad club work 
throughout the country are serving on the omen's Advisory Committee of 
the national Republican veterans' organization. 

Campaign Chairman Herbert Brownell, Jr. today made public a 
list of some of the Tomen leaders as reported to him by Mrs. Norton H. Pearl 
of Detroit, Chairman of the ,'omen'n Section of Republican Veterans for Oewey 
and .r»rren. 

In setting up the women's or,<?ml nation, f'rs. Pearl, rho recently 
retired as national President of the i.m*»ric*n Legion auxiliary. Is Torking 
closely 'ith Director of Veterans' activities Harry .'. Colmery of Topeka, Kas., 
national chairman of Republican Veterans for Dewey and .,?.rren and a past 
national commander of the American Legion. 

Mrs. Pearl is now a member of the national executive committee 

of the Legion Auxiliary r.nd chairman of the Americanism and Rehabilitation 

committees. She is also active in the .'omen's Tfavy League, Daughters of the 

American Revolution one! Federation of omen's Clubs. 

Among the -omen associated -'ith her In the Republican veterans' 

organization ?re 15 past national Presidents of the American Legion Auxiliary. 

One of this sroup, 'frs. Lo-ell F. Hobsrt. 2912 Vernon Place, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, was formerly President r-eneral of the D.-ughtera of the 

American Revoluti'm , • 

Mrs. Joseph ''ann of Los Angeles, a past national President 

of the Veterans of Foreign .'ti auxiliary. Is likewise serving on the Repubb- 

can Advisory committee. She formerly lived in Mlnsourl, 

Past national Presidents of the Legion *nxillary serving on 

Kr», Pearl's committee include: 

Mrs. Melville liucklestone Mrs. Lawrence Smith 

6529 Kenwood .ive. , Chicago Racine, .'isconeln 

Mrs. J. V. Macauley Mrs. Robert Talbrldge 

320 N. Carroll St. U. S. 0. Club 

Madison, lsconsln Onset, Massachusetts 

- Pag* 1 - 



4UWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 

1337 CONNECTICUT AV«PJ**"" I* 

WASHINGTON 6. DJ 




1* 

48 



.-/_atr FOR WBLJSASB ' i £^3 

Morning Papersj 
Thursday, Oct, 21, 1948 
Hadio Release 6J00 PM.E5T 
Wednesday, Oct. 20, 1948 

TEXT OF THE ADDRESS OF GOVERNOR THOMAS E.' DEWEY, REPUBLICAN 
NOMINEE FOR PRESIDENT, DELIVERED AT TH^'fflW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 
FORUM, HELD AT THE WALDORF-ASTORIA HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, WEDNESDAY 
3VENL7G, OCTOBER 2C, 1948. 

I consider it an honor to be the closing speaker at thi3 Forum which was 
opened by one of the most distinguished Americans of our time, Mr. Bernard Baruch. 
His message was an inspiring vision of a future in which miracles long dreamed of 
would come to pass by the use of atomic energy, and other miracles never dreamed of 
before would seem to be within the realm of probability. 

It wa3 deeply gratifying to me to observe the nice balance drawn by your first 
s-oeaker between the hard necessity of guarding our atomic secrets for military pur- 
poses and the glowing prospects of the use of atomic Dower for a fuller, better life. 
We can all pray that we shall rapidly atroroach the time when this new giant which 
now helps to keep the Tjeace of the world, will also be lifting burdens from the backs 
of men and in countless directions enriching the lives of human beings everywhere. 

Even when that time comes the conservation of our other nhysical resources will 
still be a matter of nrimary concern. With unlimited rjower at the disposal of men, 
we will still need water, minerals, lumber, food and fiber. Even when we have 
learned to convert the elements into basic foods, we shall still need products of 
the soil. 

For these reasons the discussion at this forum of our natural resources is 
particularly timely and I have read with interest the summaries of the discussions 
in this vital field of conservation. It is a curious thing how men who seem to dis- 
agree so sharply can in reality all be substantially right. For one example, it is 
an alarming fact that we have been losing billions of tons of top soil a year. 

On this subject I speak with a good deal of i*rsonal interest. On my own 
farm, when I first went there, I had a ten acre field of corn washed out by rains 
twice in one Srjring, To get one crop of corn we had to make three plantings. 
Similar conditions still exist all over the country and this v?ry year I have seen 
heartbreaking erosion in wheat fields, corn fields, and even in grasslands from 
Maine to Oregon. 

But there is a bright side to this nicture, too. The field which some years 
ago was washed out twice in one Spring on my own farm has now been contoured and 
in several succeeding years there has not been a vestige of erosion. The practice 
of contour plowing, strip cropping and terracing is spreading so rapidly that I 



Republican NA^WpSEfl Committee 

Nr Ul P g r I r l ( r 1337 Connecticut »ven^» 

tHO K t L t A t WASHINGTON 6. D. Pj£ 

X-E 815 "^' 

. 7 ^ r- FOR RELEASE 

Korning Newspapers 
Saturday, Sept. 4, 1948 

All signs point toward a Dewey-Warren landslide victory in New York State. 

That was the report Alger B. Chapman, nanager of the New York State Dewey-Warren 
Cewpaign, and Glen R. Bedenkapp, chairman of the Republican State Committee for New 
York, jointly made today to Herbert Brownell, Jr., national manager of the Dewey- 
Warren campaign. 

After conferring with Mr. Brownell, i'r. Chapman and Mr. Bedenkapp jointly issued 
the following statement at Republican national oanroaign headquarters in Washington? 

"We were happy to renort to Mr. brownell that the campaign to carry New York 
State for our national standard— bearers , Governors Thomas Z. Dewey and Sari Warren, 
is going very well. 

"The enthusiasm of our campaign workers and the evidence of overwhelming support 
of the people for election of the Eewey-Warren ticket, and Republican candidates for 
Congress and public offices in New York, clearly herald victory for the Itepublican 
Party. 

"All signs point toward a landslide victory for the Devey-Warren ticket in New 
York State. 

"Of course, ve are not going to let up in our campaigning and sit on our hands. 
Though the Democrats are quarreling among themselves, the various splinters are all 
busy on the special axes they have to grind. 

"Governor Dewey »as reelected Governor in 1946 by the largest majority in 
history — 687,151 votes over the united opposition of the Democrat, .american Labor, 
Liberal and Communist parties. 

"We confidently believe on the basis of reports from all over the state and 
personal campaigning that on next November 2, the Devey-Warren ticket will receive 
more votes than the combined votes of opposition tickets. 

"Pew Yorkers like Governor Dewey. They like what he has done for New York as 
the first Republican Governor in 22 years. They like the way he has cut taxes and 
provided for sensible labor-management relations, a veterans' program that is a 
model for the I T ation, necessary legislation on behalf of our farmers, and for expan- 
sion and strengthening of our school system, hll our people, in every walk of life, 
have benefitted by Governor Dewey's humanitarian works. 

"That is the kind of leadership Governor Dewey and his able, experienced running- 
mate, Governor Warren, will give to the Ration, with our people going forward in the 
American way and throwing out the alien-minded rascals who now infect our Government 
at Washington." •**«**** 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican Na-Aonal Committee 



I3S7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 8. D. C. 



X-E 815 
1^ 



¥55 



FOR RELEASE 

Morning Newspapers 
Tuesday , Sept. 21, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 FM, 

EDT. 
Monday, Sept. 20, 1948 

TEXT OF THE ADDRESS 3Y GOVERNOR THOMAS E. DE'.VEY, 
OFFICIALLY QPBSINO HIS CAMPAIGN FOR THE PRESIDENCY, DELIVERED 
AT DRAKE STADIUM, DESMOINES.IOWA, MONDAY BTOSIS3 SEPTEMBER 20, 
1948, AND 3R0ADCA5T OVER THE NATION '.'.'IDE NETWORKS OF THE 
COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM AND THE MUTUAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 
FROM 8:00 to 8:30 P.M. CST. 

Tonight we enter upon a campaign to unite America. On January 20, we will enter 
upon a new era. We propose to install in Washington an Administration which has 
faith in the American people, a warm understanding of their need3 and the competence 
to meet them. 

We will rediscover the essential unity of our peotsle and the spiritual strength 
which makes our country great. We will begin to move forward again shoulder to 
shoulder toward an even greater America and a tetter life for every American, in a 
Nation working effectively for the peace of the world. This is my pledge to my 
fellow citizens, the declaratidn of the principles and purposes of your next Ad- 
ministration! 

I pledge to you that as President, every act of mine will he determined by one 
principle above all others: is this good for our country? 

I pledge to you that my Administration will be made up of men and women devoted 
to that same principle - of men and women whose love of their country comes ahead of 
every other consideration. They will know how to translate their devotion to our 
country into constructive action. 

I pledge to you a foreign policy based upon the firm belief that we can have 
peace. That policy will be made effective by men and women who really understand 
the nature of the threat to peace and who have the vigor, the knowledge and the ex- 
perience required to wage peace successfully. 

I pledge to you a Government of team work. The executive heads of your Govern- 
ment will be really qualified for their positions and they will be given full respon- 
sibility to do their job without loose talk, factional quarreling or appeals to 
group prejudice. They will. know how to work together as a team and one of the most 
important members of that team will be the distinguished Governor of California, the 
next Vice President of the United States, Earl Warren. 

I pledge to you an Administration which will know how to work with the elected 
representatives of the people in tho Congress, an Administration that wants to work 
with them, and will do so. The unity we need for the Nation will be practiced in the 
Nation's Capitol, 



NEWS RELEASE 






Republican National Committee 

1337 CONNECTICUT A'lHHB* - ' ^ I] 
WASHINGTON 6. ul! C. 



48 . 



*- </> 



I'OR RELEASE 



Morning newspaper* 
Wednesday, October 27,1946 
6:00 P.M.,. ladio 
Tuesday, October 26, 1948 



TEXT OF THE ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS 8* 05*51, 

republican sotiarcrs for mbsidsw, delivered at tt-tc Chicago 

STADIUM, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Oil TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 26, 
1948, BROADCAST OVER THE MATIONWIDE RADIO NETWOHK OF THE 
NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, AND TELEVISED OVER THE MID- 
WESTERN NETWORK OF THE AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY, FROM 
9:00 to 9:30 P.M., C.3.T, 



I am delightpd to open this final week of the campaign here in Chicago at 
the cross-roads of America. During th^se past few weeks, I have set forth our pro- 
gram in partnership with my distinguished associate your next Vice-President, 
Governor Earl '".'arren. The purpose of this campaign i3 clear—it is to bring tome- 
thing better to our country than the confusion, inconsistencies, weakness and bitter- 
ness we now have in Washington, 

Governor V/arren and I have fully and frankly stated our views on the 
issues of thi3 campaign. We have charted the course we believe our country should 
follow these next four years. That is the course to which we are committed and we 
are pledged to its performance. 

We all know the sad record of the present administration. More than three 
years have passed since the end of the war and it has failed to win the peace. In- 
stead, millions upon millions of people have been delivered into Soviet slavery 
while our own administration has tried appeasement on one day and bluster the next. 
Our country desperately needs new and better leadership in the cause of peace and 
freedom. It needs a Government that will lead from strength to build peace in the 
world so that your sons and mine will not have to go through another war. 

The present administration has failed even more miserably at home. And 
now, faced with failure, with their party stilit in all directions, its candidate! 
have spread fantastic fears among our people. They are openly sneering at the 
ancient American ideal of a free and united people. They have attempted to promote 
antagonism and prejudice. They have scattered reckless abuse along the entire right 
of way from coast to coast and have now, I am sorry to say, reached a new low of 
mud-»slinging, 

I know that you regret as much as I do that this should have happened. 
That is the kind of campaign I refuse to wage. To me this is more than just a 
campaign to win an election. It is a campaign to strengthen and unite our country 



NEWS RELEASE 
»-E 815 



Republican Nationa l .Co> lmittk v. 

n 
J 48 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. 



FOR RELEASE 

7:00 PM. ^ST 

Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1948 



7 



STAT5MHBrr BY HEBBBBT B10*RO5LL f JR*' l CAMPAIGN MANAGE 
?0R 'PIE rB'^Y-WARBSS TICKET. 



It is fortunate for the Nation that the American people have less than a 
week more during which they must submit to demonstrations of Pendergast ward 
politics such as those indulged in by Mr. Truman at Chicago last night and at 
Cleveland tonight. It is a humiliating spectacle* and it has potentialities 
of serious damage to our national prestige abroad. 

The Democrat candidate's effort to picture himself as an outstanding champion 
of human rights is completely ridiculous when his -rords are contrasted with his 
record. He had a chance once to demonstrate hi3 belief in human rights - on 
August 25, 1942 when the Senate was considering a Republican amendment to the 
soldier vote bill, the amendment being a proposal to prohibit the collection of 
poll taxes as a prerequisite to voting by men in the armed services. The then 
Senator from Missouri? Mr* Truman* voted a ainst that amendment. So did his 
■ore sent running-mate , Senator Alben W. Barkley* of Kentucky 4 

Mr. Truman's record on this, and numerous other issues, demonstrates how much 
importance can be attached to his words. 

I was highly amused at Mr. Truman's state me nt;"Tonight I want to let you in 
on a secret, 'ie have the Republicans on the run." 

That is certainly the best-kept secret in all history. 



* # * * 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 815 
• *1£ 



Risr*uni.iCAN National Committer 

11 



1337 CONNECTICUT AV 
WASHINGTON 6. D 




48 



l"OU RELEASE 



For morning napers of 
Thursday, October 14, 1948 
Radio Release 6 FM, EST 



K% 



SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EAHL "YARRETT t,F C XIFOHIHA 



Republican nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Spokane, :7ash, 
8:30 PM, PST, Wednesday, October 13, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and ny Fellow Americans : 

It is good to be back here in the '/est again. I an happy to be both in the 
state of '.'ashington and in the city of Spokane tonight. ."e'have had a long trip 
to get here, "le left San Francisco four weeks ago tod?,y. '.'e have, been from coast 
to coast and from border to border. 'Ve have traveled through 29 states, through 
more than 100 cities. It has been a wonderful experience. 

Everywhere we have stopped, we have been shown the same friendly consideration 
and hospitality. People of both parties have come to visit with me. They have 
been friendly and have given me a good /imeric^n hearing. The farther I have trav- 
eled, the more I have become convinced that because of the way we live under free 
institutions that give us the right and the opportunity to travel where we will, 
communicate with whom we wish, work at ivhat we desire, and have a voice in our 
government, our country has become one great neighborhood. 

That belief is the more inspiring when we consider that there are few places 
in the world outside of this country where such is the fact. It is my belief that 
in a great national campaign such as v;e nre now engaged in, it is the duty of the 
candidates to strengthen that unity in ever 1 / possible way. It is our solemn duty 
to see that on the third day of November our people are "jore united and our country 
therefore stronger than it was before we opened the campaign. The rain objective 
of free government and of every democratic process inherent in it is to unite the 
people for strength rather than to divide and 'veaken them. 

Consequently, wherever we have traveled, I have done my best to strengthen 
that unity. I have pleaded our cause Without abuse or villificetion of anyone. I 
have attacked the motives of no one. I have not blamed the administration or any 
party or any individual for the problems that confront the American people. It 
serves no purpose to live in the past, '.'e must live for today and the future. It 
is only fair to recognize - and I have stated frankly - that many of our most 
serious problems spring from the fact that we recently fought a great war for free- 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 

#5? 



!3S7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E 815 
Z1S 



n 



FOR RELEASE 4£ 

FLAT SATURDAY A. M. RELEASE 

SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EARL BARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 

(Prepared for delivery at Pueblo at 
8:45 p.m. EST Friday, Sept. 17,1948) 

Mr. Chairman and fellow Americans of Pueblo: 

I am happy to be in your fine city. This is my first opportunity to visit 
here. I have on occasions passed through on the train. I have also flown over it; 
and have always ranted to know more about what is the most important part of any 
city, its people. But neither time nor the occasion permitted me to have an extended 
visit here. 

Tonight I come under particularly favored circumstances. I came at the invi- 
tation of the Republicans of your city to discuss our national government, the most 
priceless possession of every American. I come at the express request of the man 
1*0, I believe, — and I'm sure you believe-- is to be the next President of the Unitec 
States — Governor Thomas E. Dewey. I come here on one of the great days of history,' 
not only of American history but of world history. It is the anniversary of the 
signing of the Constitution of the United States. 161 years ago today, the founding 
fathers filed out of little old Constitutional Hall at Philadelphia after attaching 
their signatures to the immortal document. Anxious people were waiting outside the 
door to learn the results of the months of discussion. Everyone knew there were 
serious differences of opinion to be reconciled— that the convention was made up of 
strong-minded men vfoo could not be easily swayed or changed, men who represented 
diverse constituencies and conflicting interests. But they also knew they had all 
played their part in the 57ar of Independence and that, above all, they were patriots. 
They filed out the door weary and serious. A woman, addressing Benjamin Franklin, 
said, "Doctor, what kind of a government have you given usT" His answer was, "A 
Republic, madame, if you can keep it." Those words of Franklin's were true in 1781. 
They can be repeated with equal truth in 1948. T e still have a Republic, if we can 
keep it— and those of you who are here tonight are giving evidence of the fact that 
we are still working to keep it. 

I think it*s unfortunate that we don't Hake more of Constitution Day. I 
regret that the story of the Constitution, and everything that it stands for, was 
not re-told today to the children in every schoolroom of America. I think every 
church bell in America could well ring today in recognition of the right of every 



NEWS RELEASE 



Rkptji ilxcan National Committee 



CTICUT AVENUE 







fcfc> 



FOR RELEASE 



Afternoon Papers, 
Friday, October 32, 1948 



Herbert Browne 11, Jr., Dewey-Warren Campaign Manager, today made public the 
itinerary for Governor Dewey's final campaign week. 

The final week of canvnaigning, which will bring the Republican nominee for 
President into Chicago, Cleveland, Boston and New York city for major windup 
speeches, will also bring him into Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut 
for back platform appearances enroute. 

The De'-fey Victory Special Campaign train will leave Albany early Tuesday 
morning, 12:01 A.M. EST, for Chicago, He will arrive in Chicago at 4:00 PM.SST 
and will stay over night in the Stevens Hotel. That evening will deliver a major 
address at a rally held in the Chicago Stadium which will be broadcast over the 
nationwide networks of the National Broadcasting Company. The speech will also be 
televised over the midwe stern network of the American Broadcasting Company. The 
Governor will speak from 10:00 to 10:30 PM, EST, 

On Wednesday, October 27, Governor Dewey will leave Chicago at 10:00 AM and will 
arrive in Cleveland at 5:00 PM. EST, That evening he will address a rally at the 
Cleveland Auditorium. His address, from 9:00 to 9:30 PM,EST. will be broadcast 
over the nationwide network of the National Broadcasting Company. He will leave 
Cleveland that evening at 10:30 PM.EST. 

in Thursday, October 28th, Governor Dewey will make back olatform arr^earancea 
at Pittsfield, Springfield, Worcester, and Franingham, all in Massachusetts, during 
the day before he arrives in Boston at 4:30 PM. EST. 

At Boston he will address a rally held in the Boston Arena, His address will 
be broadcast from 9:00 to 9:30 PM.SST over the nationwide network of the Columbia 
Broadcasting Company. He will stay in Boston overnight at the Statler Hotel, 

On Friday, October 29th, Governor Dewey will leave Boston at 9:20 AM.EST and 
will make the following back olatform a-o^earances during the day enroute to New 
York City: North Attleboro, Mass.; Providence and Westerly, Rhode Island; Hew 
London and several ether stops in Connecticut. He will arrive in New York City at 
5:45 PM.EST. 

On Saturday, October 30th, Governor Dewey will address the final windup rally 
in Madison Square Garden in the evening. His address will be broadcast from 9:30 
to 10:00 PM. EST over the nationwide network of the National Broadcasting Company 
and televised over the eastern network of Columbia Broadcasting Com-nany. 



NEWS RELEASE 






Republican National Committee 



1337 III IIMii H 

WASHINGT<lfl6. DT'C.il 






I<X>U RELEASE 



Friday Morning Papers, 
October 22, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 FM.3ST 
Thursday, October 21,1948 



FOLLOWING IS THE TEXT OF AN ADDRESS BY SENATOR 
EUGENE D. MILLIKIN, REPUBLICAN, OF COLORADO, CHAIRMAN OF 
THE SENATE REPUBLICAN CONFEREUCE AND CHAIRMAN OF THE SENATE 
COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. AT THE FINANCIAL WORLD'S ANNUAL REPORT 
AWARD DINNER, PENNSYLVANIA HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, THURSDAY, 
OCTOBER 21. 



Prior to World War I, the two major political parties often searched for, 
and were happy to find, issues in foreign affairs which could be exploited for parti- 
san advantage. The vital inter-relationships of nations were not so evMent, there 
was protection In distance, and we had not attained world leadership. 

But the failure of World War I to bring the lasting peace which it was 
intended to produce, and the contribution to that tragic result of partisan differ- 
ences in this country, challenged the soundness of the old approach. 

Moreover, World War I moved us into world leadership and its unavoidable 
responsibility for the formulation, promotion, and administration of acceptable 
international policies. 

We have learned that likemlndedness among nations is not automatic. We 
have observed that nations dealing with us are cold realists in the appraisal of 
our programs. Hard-headed, entirely unsentimental consideration is given to perti- 
nent factors such as the political situation in this country, our economic strength, 
our moral strength, our existing and potential military strength. 

When we focus these assets in unity toward the accomplishment of our aims, 
and if they fortify a sound cause, we are apt to be irresistible. 

But when other nations find us engaged in partisan conflict as to what it 
or should be our international policy, they find it too risky to tie themselves to 
us. They cannot stake their destinies on our policies when they are heavily 
weighted with unstable factors here at home. Opposition when it develops, cannot 
be overcome with disunity. 

Thought on such matters has produced a reorientation of approach by the 
major nartles. Now, in contrast to the old way of exploitation of difference, the 
search is for areas of agreement which when found, become bipartisan foreita policy. 

It is a wholesome change. Bipartisan foreign policy fits the perils of 
the times. The peace of the world may well depend upon its intelligent development. 



NEWS RELEASE 

~X-E 315 



Republican National Co.M>nrrEE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6. 
10 




N* 



i5w 



56 'W 



~7 



-<*£ 



48 

FOR RELEASE 



IMMEDIATE 
September 18, 1948. 



KEFRESENTATIT7E LEONARD If, HALL OP NEW YOHK, CHAIRMAN OF THE NATIONAL 
REPUBLICAN CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGB COMMITTEE, ISSUED THE FOLLOWING STATE- 



"Oscar R. Ewing, Administrator of the Federal Security Administration which 
has jurisdiction over the Federal Office of Education, is exhibiting colossal 
ignorance in his running attack upon Governor Thomas S. Dewey's outstanding 
record in aid to education and improvement of the lot of school teachers. 

"Mr, Ewing seems to have a penchant for repeating his misrepresentations 
even after the facts have been put before him. His flare for fabricating again 
was revealed in an address at Highland Park, N, J., today. 

"It is an interesting commentary on the Democrat Administration that the 
chief function of the head of the Federal Security Administration is to act as a 
political hatchet man. I know of no other service performed by Mr. Ewing. 

"Governor Dewey's record in the fields of welfare and health in New York 
State needs no defense. He raised the salaries of Hew York State school teachers 
so that they are today the highest in the world, and the State has been paying 
83 per cent of the increase, which Mr. Ewing might have found out if he were in- 
terested in the facts. 

"Mr. Ewing becomes downright pitiful when he attacks Governor Dewey in con- 
nection with the fair employment law, which Was passed in New York State under 

Governor Dewey's leadership, and which has. been administered to the complete sati 
faction of all. Truly, the Democrat Administration has done nothing in this fiel 

except to talk about it - nothing but talk." 



field 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 8i$ 



RBPtmucAN National Committek 



I3S7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



FOR RELEASK 



Thurs. A.M. Papers, 
Oct. 38, 1948 
Radio 6:00 P.M., *% r l 
•/fed. Oct. 27, 1948 



h 
Y« 

48 



%3 



TZXZ OF TH^ ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS S. TJWSTt 
REPUBLICAN NOMINA FOR PR^SIITCNT, DELIV^D AT THE CLEVELAND 
AUDITORIUM, CLEVELAND, OHIO, ON WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 
27, 1948, AMD BROATCAST OVER THE NATIONWIDE NETWORK OF THE 
NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 



Governor Warren and I have had the high honor of presenting fully and in 
detail the issues of this canvoaign. We have done so soberly and constructively and 
I believe we have advanced the cause of the neace of the world by advancing the 
unity of our country. I am nroud to 3ay we have not been guilty of using our high 
responsibility to rip our country anart or to arouse fear and -orejudices. We will 
win this camoaign and we 'fill win it by clean and decent methods. 

For the tiast six years, Earl Warren and I have led two of the most 
complex State Governments in the Nation. We have sought to lead them without 
bitterness, without partisanshit) and with an honorable restect for the opinions of 
those who differ from us. I think we have brought a new sense of unity and of 
friendliness, neighbor for neighbor and community for community among the people of 
our states. We shall bring to our National Government next January that same 
atmosphere of friendliness among all tha people of the United States and of compel 
tenoe and strength for the neace of the world. 

We are uroud to come before our country as Retjublicans. But, we do so 
in no narrow sense of partisanship. In the eighty years of its existence, the 
party of Lincoln has consistently led in the struggle to keep the flag of freedom 
flying. Our party was born in the vortex of a struggle to advance the cause of 
human freedom. Once again that cause calls for devotion and ceaseless effort and 
we Invite all Americans, regardless of party, to rally to that banner. 

We do not assert that there is only one party in the Uni.ted States that 
is fit to govern. We do not believe in one -party rule. That is totalitarianism. 
Both great parties have alternately served our country well. But administrations 
grow •■wary in office. They lose their grasn. They become fumbling and weak. 
Responsibility finally falls into faltering hands while internal strife and bitter- 
ness destroy their capacity to govern. That is why we have two parties in this 
country, the one vigorous and able to take over when the other falters and fails. 



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FOR IJEI.EAHE . $ 



1 P.M., CST Friday, Sept. 10, 194B 

EXCERPTS FROK THE ADDKESS OF HUGH D. SCOTT, JR. CHAIBMAH 
REPUBLICAN IUTI0HAL COIMTTSE, B3F03E THE EXECUTIVES 
CLUB,, 0? CHICAGO. S3PT33EII 10 , 1948. , 

SIX STEPS TO STABILITY 



M 



If America is to resume the march of progress we oust restore a 
degree of long-term stability in our economy. That is the broad 
task before the new Administration which will take over in Uashington 
next January, tfe can not anticipate a thriving and constructive 
national economy so long as we operate on a floating dollar — a 
dollar which lias lost more than 40 percent of its purchasing power 
during the last ten years. 

As a direct result of this very considerable degree of inflation 
we are confronted today with a vast complex of social and political 
problems which can be ameliorated only by a restoration of economic 
stability. The whole field of education, from the grade schools 
through the colleges, is dislocated by today's rapidly advancing 
costs. Some careful students of the problem estimate that an 
increase of 35 percent in our to tal educational expenditures would 
not be sufficient to restore the whole system to its pre-war basis 
of adequacy and efficiency. 

The same situation prevails in relation to hospital and 
medical costs, and to all sorts of public services. 

All these deficits pile up from year to year in new demands 
for additional tax revenues all along the line, from the county 
seat to the Federal Treasury. From Coast to Coast, county 
commissions and city councils are constantly seeking out new 
sources of revenue. In many instances the tax base is being 
expanded to yield more revenue without changing the tax rate 
percentagewi se. 

But the local communities are face to face with the fact 
that they are almost to the end of the line on the matter of 
taxes. It is becoming increasingly difficult to locate new 



/ Republican National Committee 

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8:00 P.M., EDT Thursday, Sept. 9,1948 



EXCERPT FROM THE ADDRESS OF HUGH D. SCOTT, JR. CHAIRMAN 
REFU3LICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE, BEFORE MARYLAND REPUBLICAN 
RALLY. BALTIMORE. SEFTSilBSR 9, 1948. 

I count .it a happy prf.vi.lege to address this gathering tonight, because all the 
reports we have received thus far at headquarters from Maryland indicate that the 
State will be solidly in the iiswry-Warren column on November second. 

This is especially reassuring to those of us who have been organizing the 
Dewey-Warren campaign in V.'ashington, for it is a fact that Maryland i3 a true index 
of national trends in presidential elections. It has become a political axiom that, 
"As goes Maryland, so goes the Nation." 

You are to be count- nded for your militant organizational work, for your hard- 
hitting campaign tactics, for your aggressive and uncompromising fight for true-blue 
Americanism. 

Strong in the justice of our cause, we will curry this fight to every voter in 
Maryland, to every voter in the U.S. 'v'e must beware of over confidence, of course, 
because ballots will not be counted unless voters go to the polls. But this year we 
intend to see that every vote is counted. 

I had the privilege of spending two hours with Governor Dewey in Albany a short 
time ago. V/hen I told him I was planning this trip to Maryland, he did not differ 
in any degree from ny assurance that Maryland is on our side in this fight, because 
Maryland ha3 a deep tradition of more than three-hundred years of steadfast devotion 
to freedom and individual liberty. Maryland will not throw her electoral weight 
into the scales on the side of the collectivist experimenters nov; in control in 
Washington. 

This has been, in many respects, an amazing campaign. We started out in June 
with a firm pledge to the American people to conduct a clean, constructive, hard- 
hitting campaign. The response to that pledge has been most gratifying. 

I am one who holds high aspirations for this 1948 campaign. It is my earnest 
hope that by conducting an honest American campaign we might set it down in history 
that we helped make this great land of ours the land where hate died, Let others 
set class against class. Let others inflame the unwary by avid appeals to greed 
and privilege. Let us consider what is best for Americans and be very sure that 
such a course is best for Americas 



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Morning Papers 

Friday, October 29, 1948 

Miss Sophie Kerr, nationally known writer and editor, in a statement 
released today through Mrs. Charles W. Weis, Jr., Associate Campaign Manager of 
the Dewey-Warren Ticket, announced her support of the Dewey-Warren Ticket. 

Her statement is as follows: 

"As a woman I have appreciated Mr. Dewey's attitude toward women. He has 
appointed more women to public office than any Governor in the United States and 
more than any previous Governor of the State of New York. The offices to which 
Mr. Dewey appointed women were not mere frill-and-fluff places without responsi- 
bility. They were real jobs with plenty of hard work required; some were 
salaried and some were not but all were serious and meant something. 

"As a citizen of the State of Sew York I have profited by Mr. Dewey's common 
sense, economy and justice in State Administration. He is honest and he is 
mighty able. He can't be bought and he can't be scared. No White House clique 
is going to do his thinking for him and tell him what to say and do. He is 
energetic and a hard worker. He is an experienced executive. I believe he will 
make a truly great President and heaven knows we need one. 

"As for Governor Warren, though I live a long way from California his 
record is known to me and respected. The Dewey-Warren Ticket is a promise of 
a competent intelligent and thoroughly patriotic administration for all the 
people of these United States." 



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Republican National Committee 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 



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Afternoon Newspapers 
'Wednesday, Oct. i3, 1948 

TEXT OF THE ADDH53S BY GOV^HNOB THCMAS 3. LEW3Y, 
REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOB PRESIDENT, TO BE KELIV 7 !E' ! T5 IS 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA, WEDITCSDAY AFT^KTOOIT, OCTOB^ 13, 
1948. 

It is a real pleasure to come again to Oklahoma City, In the last few 
•eeks I have again travelled the whole great reach of our country — from the East 
Coast to the 'Test Coast, from border to border, and back again to this beautiful 
city in the heart of America. I have seen and talked with thousands won thousands 
of our fellow citizens, and I bring you good news from them. Throughout this 
nation a great tide is rising — everywhere our people are joining up in this 
campaign to bring new strength, new faith and new unity to America.. 

It is an inspiring display of the deeti and fervent desire of everyone 
of us to meet squarely the problems that face America. As we meet tonight, one 
overshadowing thought troubles all of us. At home, at school or at work, probably 
few of us have gone through this day without some thought about world peace. We 
all know that we are living in a deeply troubled world. We know there are aggressive 
forces threatening the peace* I deeply believe that we have learned as a nation 
the most urgent lesson of our time — that America must be strong. The plain fact 
is that strength — economic, military, moral strength — is a stark,, grim necessity 
if we are to live and go forward. Free nations must be strong — or they will lose 
their freedoms. Peace-loving nations must be strong — » or there can be no peace. 

In order to be strong again, we are determined to cast off the shackles 
of confusion and defeatism and despair. We are going to unite behind a new adminis- 
tration that is devoted, above all, to the cause of strengthening America, an 
administration that is dedicated to building a better America in a world at peace. 

One of the most urgent of truths is that freedom and peace nourish each 
other. The really great strides of human progress have been made by free men living 
at peace. We are devoted to the cause of peace and we are eternally dedicated to 
the cause of freedom, 

America has given to the world many proofs of its desire to live at 
Mace with all nations. Our people, by a great united effort, won a tremendous 
military victory. Yet the whole world knows that America asked no tribute, no 
reparation, no imperial conquest as the reward of that victory. The whole world 
knows that America does not covet a single acre of any other nation 1 * soil. 

We have sought no tribute from our beaten enemies,. Instead, America 



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Morning Newspapers 
Tuesday, October 12, 1948 

6:00 P.M., Radio 
Monday, October 11, 1948 



ADDRESS OF SENATOR ROBERT A. TAFT FRCM MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM, NASHVILLE. 
TENNESSEE, OCTOBER 11, 1948, at 9:00 FM, C3T. 

It Is a great pleasure to me to come to Tennessee and meet again so many of 
my Republican friends, and express my gratitude to them for the support which they 
gave me in 1940 and 1948, It is a pleasure for any Cincinnatian or any Taft to 
visit here because for a long time there has been a close commercial and friendly 
connection. On many political issues we have thought alike and had the same prob- 
lems to meet. 

In the 90»s when my father was a Federal Circuit Judge, he held court many 
times here in Nashville and throughout the State of Tennessee, and counted among 
his best friends the lawyers and others, Reuublicans and Democrats, who appeared 
before him or worked with him at that time. Later when he was President, he ap- 
pointed his Democrat colleague on the Circuit Court bench, Horace H. Lurton, of 
Tennessee, to the United States Supreme Court. The Secretary of 'far in his Cabinet 
was Jacob Dickinson, also a Democrat and from Nashville . He became very sympathet- 
ic to the problems of the South, and was popular with Southerners, He told me 
once that he thought Southerners would do anything for him except vote for him. 
As a matter of fact, even at that time most Southerners had the same basic 
political philosophy as William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and my father. They 
were as much opposed to the radicalism of ''illiam Jennings Bryan as they are op- 
posed to Harry Truman today. They believed then, as they believe now, in the free- 
dom of the individual, and the freedom of the local community, to live their own 
life and run their own affairs. They were opposed then, as they are now, to build- 
ing up the Federal Government to a position where it plans, directs and regulates 
the lives of every farmer, every workman, every business, every housewife and every 
family. 

But the issue was not so clear then as it is today. The Federal Government 
was a simple organization of fairly limited powers, and its greatest extension of 
control was over the railroads and big business obviously beyond the ability of 
the States to regulate. There were differences between the parties growing out of 



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WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 




Immedia 

October 11, 1948 



Additional evidence of powerful labor support for the 
Dewey-Warren Ticket was cited today by Herbert Brownell, Jr., 
Republican Rational Campaign Manager, who predicted that a 
majority of union labor will vote the Republican ticket on 
Kovemher 2. ttr. Brownell called attention to the October 10th 
issue of "The steelworker News", published from the Philip 
.Murray Buildin;.,, Cary Indiana, which carries on its front 
page a letter signed by E. T. Colcsimo, who took a leave of 
absence from his position as Editor of this publication to 
support the Dewey-Warren Ticket. 

In addition to referrin to i.:>. Colosimo's latter, 
Mr. Brownell also made public a letter received by the Labor 
Division of the Republican liatlonal Coimr.iittee endorsing and 
supporting the Dewey -'barren Ticket, and 3igned by the 
following influential officers of CIO unions: Clarence W. 
Johnson, Herman to. Anderson, Robert E. Cox, Garrett J. Major, 
Prank Getridgc, otis Thoma3 and John R. Buksar. 

Commenting on these Increasing indications of labor 
support, Mr. brownell said: 

"We arc delighted that so many influential labor 
leaders are endorsing the Republican ticket and prom- 
ising it their support. It will be recalled that 
only this morning it wns announced that an independent 
t-ade union committee known as "Labor For Dewey and 
V/arren 1 ' is in process of or animation in dew York 
Strte, ur.de the les.de rs nip uf John J. O'Rourke, 
President of the lew York City "Teamsters Council and 
of Truck Drivers Local 2132, International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs and Helpers. 

"It will also be recalled that when Governor Dewey 
passed through St. Louis about a week ago a group of 
labor leaders and members, including representatives 
of both A. P. of L. and C. I. 0. unions held an unscheduled 
meotinr with Governor Dewey and formally endorsed the 
Dewey-Warren candidacies. Several weeks ago W. L. 




functioning actively in practically every industrial 
State. Organized labor is demonstrating conclusively 
that it prefers action to promises, and that it is tired 
of an Administration which has treated it as a political 
company union. It is highly gratifying In. the closing 
weeks of the esmpaiLn to have these indications that 
leaders and members of both the A.F.of L. and C.I.C. 
unions realize the importance to the country of unity 
under theDowey Administration." 

(rr.orc) 



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Morning paper^%¥*W 
October 13, 1948 




President Truman's remark "I like old Joe Stalin" is quoted 11m a 
Republican campaign folder distributed to veterans throughout the country 
today through the Republican campaign organization. 

Campaign Director Herbert Brownell, Jr., made the document pub- 
lic, together with another circular captioned "Dewey Gets Things Done". 

Distribution of both documents was directed by Harry W. Oolmery, 
national chairman of Republican Veterans for Dewey and Warren and director 
of veterans' activities at Republican national headquarters. 

The Truman comment on Stalin is taken from a speech by the 
Democrat candidate at Eugene, Oregon, June 11, 1948, when he was quoted as 
saying, apropos of his experience at the Potsdam conference at which the 
German control zones were agreed on: 

"I got very well acquainted with Joe Stalin, and I like 
old Joe. He is a decent fellow." 
On the opposite page the former Democrat ambassador to Russia 
and France, William C. Bullitt, is quoted as having said in a recent magazine 
article that: 

"The President did not have the foresight to insist that the 
American zone of occupation in Germany must be connected with Berlin by a 
land corridor controlled by the American army." 

Above this text is reproduced a cartoon showing Truman standing 
in the middle of a room whose floor he has just painted. The legend is 
"Painted himself in". 

"Old Joe" Stalin is shown in the cartoon as an amused onlooker. 
Title of this circular is "Innocence Abroad". It asks the 
question in connection with the Berlin airlift: "Seeds of World War III?" 
The moral: "ABC's of Voting—The alternative of blundering is competence." 

In the appeal to World War XI veterans based on Governor 
Dewey's record in New York, the Republican nominee for President is given 
credit for "GI housing, GI jobs, GI bonus, GI schools, GI health, and cutting 

GI taxes. « 

James P. O'Neil of New Hampshire, national commander of the 

American Legion, is quoted as having said last January: 

"New York State has set the standard for the Nation with its 
program to assist the returned veteran in reestablishing himself." 



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WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



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Immediate 
October 14, 1948 



Governor 3arl barren, Republican Yice-Fresidential Candidate, will 
address the National Convention of the American Legion in Miami, Florida, on 
Wednesday, October 20, it was announced today by Herbert Browne 11 , J r,, Dewey- 
Warren Campaign Manager, and Cordon X. Richmond, Governor Warren's representative 
at Campaign Headquarters. 

The California Governor, a World War I veteran and a member of the Legion 
will leave Sacramento in a chartered nlane during the late afternoon of Monday, 
'October 18, and will arrive at Miami the morning of Tuesday, October 19. He will 
spend Tuesday participating in the various Convention functions scheduled for that 
day. His address on Wednesday morning is scheduled for lis 30 and shortly there- 
after lie will leave by plane for Colorado where he will probably deliver one speech 
later that same day. Immediately after the Colorado speech he will return to 
Sacramento to remain until he starter on his pre-election tour of California the 
latter part of the week. 



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Saturr" ■ 

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SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EARL T ".\RR£N OF CALIFORNIA 



dio Release, 6 Br, EST 



Republican Nominee for Vine President 
(Prepared for delivery at Duluth, Minn. 
9:00 P.M. CST, Friday, October 8, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and ray follow Americana: 

I an happy to be in this great northern country. It is only a circumstance that 
I am not a native of it. My mother was reared here. She and my father were married 
here. My older sister was born here. But the lure of the great T "est took hold of 
my father, as it has done to so many Fid-westerners before and since. So, the famify 
moved to California where T. v;a3 bcrr. a year or two later. 

Birthplace is often a controlling circumstance in the lives of people. Only 
the circumstance of birthplace miae me o Cal ifcrnian and a Far-westerner instead 
of a Minnesotan and a ?'id-wasterner. 

If it had not been for the fact that a similar lure attracted my grandparents 
to this country from Norway and Sweden, I might have been born over there. Had 
those of us here to night, our parents or rrandpcrents, not come to this country, 
many of us would have come under Nazi domination Sirring the war and would today be 
either behind the Iron Curtain, or living in daily fear of a new aggression. 

Because circumstance did bring ny grandparents to Minnesota, when my own parents 
were babes in arms, I am more appreciative than otherwise of the blessings of liv- 
ing in this country - far removed from the ever-prosent danger of agression con- 
fronting the people of Western Europe. It is easier for ne to understand how much 
like us the people of those countries are, and how important it is to world security 
that their determination to have froedom, as well as their longing for it, be kept 
alive. I have mora appreciation of the importance of our European Recovery Program, 
not only because of what it will do for them, but because of my belief in what it 
can do for us. 

Strong as we are In the United States, healthy as our .American life may be, 
there is still no assurance that we can continue to be strong, healthy and free in 
a stricken, unhealthy, shackled world where, one after another, the nations of our 
forebears are pulled behind the Iron Curtain And let ua remember that most Amer- 
icans, regardless of when they or their forebears came to this country, spring from 
the stock of the people of those nations. 

But, beyond that, we must also remember that this modern age brings closer 
and closer to our shores and our plains the threat of aggression and conquest. 
Airplanes, supersonic speeds, radar, guided missiles, and the atom bomb have shrunk 
this world to the size of a colony of early days. And although the accident of 



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RBPCntMCAN NATIOaM*eCO}fMITTKE 

, 8 ,7 co f |i | i B i,ii |(i va.u« j R 
WASHlIbTON 6| oi l c. \ Q 

IX )H RUMJASE 



PM"s October 12, 1948 



HBHnnifiM rn.m^™ ™ ADMSS ° F ''O^™ 011 THCMAS I. DBWST. 

oTr^sS/'o'c'JS/ii^^' ™ r ™ * L0UISVILM ' KY - 

The most important job that fact the American nation today is to create 
a lasting peace. Sverything we do and hope to do in these United States hangs on 
that one fundamental. There must be peace v,ith justice in the world. % must wage 
peace with all the skill and courage and determination with which we waged and won 
the war. 

The task requires a mighty sense of unity, welding our people together in 
this single purpose. There can he no division among us upon our objectives and we 
shall also have agreement on the methods of reaching them, ft must stand solidly 
behind our bipartisan representatives at all international conferences. In this 
endeavor, we have abandoned partisanship to speak through a bipartisan foreign 
policy. That was the great objective when I first proposed to Secretary Hull during 
the election campaign four years ago that we have cooperation between our two parties 
to win the peace. That was the beginning of our bipartisan foreign policy. 

It was here in Louisville four years ago that I first publicly discussed 
in detail my hopes for lasting peace through this kind of cooperation between our 
great political parties. It was cooperation between political parties to keep 
politics out of the peace. I said then that only through a non-partisan abroach to 
the shaping of a peace structure could America achieve unity of purpose. I told of 
the practical beginning I had made with Secretary Hull in bipartisan cooperation to 
establish an international organization for ittace and security. As a result, both 
parties had begun working together. A pattern had been laid which could be followed 
year after year, regardless of the party in power. 

That was the right course then. After four years of practical operation, 
it is now even clearer that this is the right course for our country. In this 
election year, the bipartisan foreign policy is the only means by which we can 3W ak 
with a united voice in the crisis we face. Unless the Republicans had been giving 
full cooperation to the Democrat Administration, we should have no strength in the 
present grave meetings of the United Nations. Our adversaries would have been able 
to seize upon our election campaign confusion to pursue their aggressions, and the 
enduring peace we hope for would certainly be lost. But it has not been lost and 
our unity has been saved by this program. 



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Republican National Com mittee 

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Morning Papers 

Fri., Oct. 15, 1948 

Kadio Release 

6:00 P.M. EST., Oct. 14 



TEXT OF THE ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS 2. DEWEY, 
REPUBLICS NOMINEE FOR FRESIDSNT. DELIVERED III THE MUNICIPAL 
AUDITORIUM, KANSAS CITY, MO. ON THURS. EVENING OCT. 14, 1948. 
FROM 8:30 to 9:00 P.M., C.S.T., AMD BROADCAST OVER THE NATION- 
WIDE NETWORK OF THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM. 

In this campai.Ti to unite Ar.erica, I have talked with many people about 
many problems, wherever I have gone I have repeated my belief — my unshakeable 
belief that for America no job is too' big when we are a united people. 

I can report to you tonight that this is also the confident belief of 
our people. As a nation we are not looking back, we are looking forward. We are 
looking ahead prayerfully and hopefully to a peaceful world. We are determined to 
make that peace secure by the strength that comes only from competent leadership 
expressing the will of a united people. 

We are looking ahead to the fruits of peace — ■ to an America where there 
are more and more of the good things of life for every one of us and ever widening 
opportunities for ourselves and our children. The whole American people are looking 
ahead. They are determined to get together, to get some leadership and to get soing. 
Our goal is an America so strong and so united that it can meet the problems of today 
and the challenge of tomorrow. Our first and most important step along the road to 
that great goal is to get a national Administration whose faith is equal to the 
faith of our people. 

We know the kind of Government we have now. It is tired. It is confused. 
It scolds and complains. It runs off in a dozen different directions at once. It 
trie3 to frighten people. It divides them. It is coming apart at the seams. What- 
ever may be its intentions, the tragic fact is that it is not strengthening the cause 
of peace and it is not strengthening America. 

We can and we will get better Government. We can get really good Govern- 
ment through thi3 election. And when we get it — on that very day — there will be 
a new spirit of confidence in America. It is not too much to say there will be a 
new hone in the world. 

All the world looks to America in this time of trouble, but we cannot 
fill our role in the world unless we have good, competent Government. We cannot 
build the kind of country you and I want for our children unless we have able 



NETTTRELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



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WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



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Afternoon Patiers, J* 
Friday, Oct. 15", 194$$ 

ADDR3SS OF HUGH SCOTT, CHAIRMAN OF TH^ REPUBLICAN 
NATIONAL COMMITTEE, BEFORE THE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF 
WOMEN'S REPUBLICAN CLUBS AT ST. PAUL, MIFTSS07A, FRIDAY 
OCTOBER 15, 1948. 



The American peonle look forward confidently to a new Administration in 
Washington next January. The Dewey-Warren victory campaign has won the cordial 
approval of the entire nation. Governors Devey and Warren promised a canmaign with- 
out bitterness, hate or smear. They have mobilized a new national unity for 
abundance, security and rjeace. 

Victory is in the air - not a partisan victory but a victory for orderly con- 
stitutional government in harmony with the dee-oest traditions of American life and 
history. Let's make it a driving finish. We seek a mandate for a housecleaning 
in Washington - a mandate of such rjro-oortions that it will be understood beyond all 
doubt the 'forld around. 

A vote of confidence from the American xjeonle entails large responsibilities 
for the Republican Party. We are to take over administrative direction of a govern- 
mental establishment which touches directly the security and welfare of more than 
40 million homes in this favored land, and the whole course of human destiny the 
world around. Since they have contributed so magnificently to the great victory, 
the women of America share these vast new responsibilities of our Party equally with 
the men, the Young Renublicans, the veterans, and every other segment of our uoxnala- 
tion. 

How shall ve live uo to those great responsibilities^ How shall we meet 
these wonderful new opportunities for faithful nubile service to all our ueOTileT 

It has been my ha-o-oy privilege during the last ten days to ricte on the camrjaign 
trains of both G-overnor Dewey and Governor Warren. I have seen these fine Americans 
in warm and friendly contact with the Tjeorjle. I have heard the cheers and atrolause 
as they outlined in straightforward and wholly candid terms the -orincinles which 
are to guide the new Administration. No American who has had contact with these 
friendly and sincere men could doubt that they are steerjed in the traditions of 
truly representative government, and that they seek to serve the com on weal with 
steadfast devotion to the ideals of American freedom. 

As you all know, the Dewey-Warren ticket has '-.on the formal rmblic endorsement 
oil some of the most influential Democrat nevsparers in the United States, among 
them the New York Times, the Baltimore Sun, the Cleveland Plain-Dealer, the Houston 



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VETERANS DIVISION mtmf^f n 




J* 

Friday, October 15, 194.3 



UV*; I ^ Aft 

BKLLASB for afternoon papers^ 



A ne" leaflet for r»er vetertns nude public tocay by Republican Ca^pcign 
Director Herbert F.ro nell, Je., reminds the veterms that under Republican leader- 
ship the SOth Congress cut 4.3 billion dollars from the net ion' a tax bill derpitc 
three vetoes by President Truman. 

The leaflet uas prepared under the direction of Uatioial Chairman liarry '•'.. 
Colioery of the Republican Vcterms for Dc-ey tmd arren, Director of Veterans' 
Activities at Republican Headquarters here. 

The record of the Republican Congress on legislation of -articular interest 

to veterans is reviered as follorss 

Housing — Guaranteed oOja to 95S on home loins. In 1943 more than 

1 million homes <vill have been built. Continued rent control. 

Taxes ~ Removed 7,400,000 lov-income ra^e earners from tax polls 
by 4.3 billion dollar slash. 

GI Bill of Rights — Increased parents end benefits. Cashed terminal 
lenve bonds. Raised coilin L 3 on -a^cs. Alio - cd travel 
expenses for vocational trainees. Provided autos 'or amputees. 
Increased revolving fund Per loans i'or GI's taking vocational 
training. Amended 1- to prevent discrimination against dis- 
abled Veterans, government emplo /cos. 

Pensions —Increased for Spanish-American and Civil ~ar Veterans. 

Granted i or dependents of ;.r t eae. Granted to dependents 
of Veterans '-ho ore el^ible for service-connected dirability 
not less than &0& Gro ted to retired reserves. Increased 
Federal t id to States i'cr assistance to veterans. Increased 
peacetime service-connected disability coper. nation from 75>j 
to _0/j of • .-;rtimc rates, 

r . : o. men's jrmy Corps — '.stable shed omen's Army Corps on permanent basis. 

Insurance— Authorized adaitional period of 5 year* for level -premium 
term insurance. 

Prisoners-of- ar — Provided compensation for Americans: .'or injuries 
resulting fron v artime imprisonment; authorized subsistence 
alio ance. 

National Defense — Pasred Unification Act. Appropriated 24 billion 
dollars for defense . eosures, -vith e:.phasis on sir pover. 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 






1337 CONNECTICUT A 
WASHINGTON 6. 

.10 




FOR RELEASE 



H77 



Morning Papers, 
Thursday, October 21, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 PM.ZST 
Wednesday, Oct. 20, 1948 



STATEMENT BY G0VTT T 0R THOMAS 3. IETSY. 



Robert H. Woods, Republican nominee for the United States Senate 
from Virginia, has richly earned that nomination by his long and devoted 
attention to the exacting tpsks of Republican State Chairman. In his 
;. -public activities he has manifested qualities of leadership vrhich show 
clearly that he will be a fine addition to the Senate of the United States. 
I look forward with great pleasure to the -orospect of working with him next 
January. We will need such men in Washington. 



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X-E 815 

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Republican Nation 



fUTTEE 

337 CONNICTICUT IjveNUI Jfi 

WASHINGTON 6.|b,_C. 

■Opt 48 



IX )K SUBLEASE 



#78 



For morning papers of 
Sunday, October 10, 1948 
Radio release 6 HI, EST 

SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EARL WAH.-OB OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican nominee for Vice Fresirtent 
(Prepared for delivery at Sioux City, Iowa, 
8:30 FM, C3T, Saturday, October 9, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and Fellow Americans: 

It is good to be in the great State of Iowa and in your thriving Sioux City. 
I have travelled more than 8,000 miles on this trip, across 26 states, V/e have 
been from San Francisco to New York, up into New England, down to Maryland, and from 
the Canadian border to the Mexican border. This is about the 100th city where wo 
have stopped and visited with the people. 

It has been a gnat experience, a thrilling one for any American. 7e have seen 
every kind of country, but everywhere the people have been the same. They have been 
friendly, they have been fair, and they have turned out to see us - without regard 
to their political affiliation - just to she* their interest in their government 
and to give another American an opportunity to be heard. 

That, my fellow- Americans, is one of the finest traits in the American character. 
I cannot help thinking as I ,o through these cities and tovms and look into the 
faces of my fellow-Americans that there are few places in the world today, outside 
of this country, free enough from fear and suspicion to permit such friendly gather- 
ings. 

I am especially happy to have the opportunity of visiting the State of Iowa once 
more because my father was raised in the little town of Eagle Grove and I still haro 
relatives in that area. 

Of course, everyone in California has relatives in Iowa, or maybe I should put 
it^the other way, and say that everyone in Iowa has relatives in California. We have 
/biggest Iowa community in the world in our state. If you have ever attended an Iowa 
Picnic in Southern California you would believe it. I have seen one hundred thousand 
people at the annual Iowa Picnic at Long Beach on more than one occasion. 

The kinship between California and Iowa and the other states of the middle west 
has been building up for many years, and it proves that our nation has become one 
great American neighborhood. 

But, there is something else that comes to my mind as I travel through your state. 
This visit recalls to me the ^scl, of food production that made it possible for thia 



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X-E 815 



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1337 CONNECTICUT AVENfE, JS 



washington 6, d. c; 
Am 






..EASE 



FOR REI 



Morning Newspapers Wed, f 
October 20, 19^8 

Badi ©..-Release 6:00 P.M. , 
October 19, 1948 



STATEMENT BY HERBERT BROWNELL, JR., CAMPAIGN MANAGER EOR TEE 
DEWEY-WARREN TICKET: 



The Adninistration has reached a new low in politics with a brazen 
attempt to sand-bag Civil Service employees in Washington into contributing 
money to finance the faltering Democrat campaign. Conclusive evidence of 
such procedure is in the possession of the Republican National Committee in 
the form of a letter on the stationery of the Democrat National Committee and 
signed by Aaron L. Ford, Chairman, Radio Time Committee, of the Democrat 
organization. This letter was sent to a Civil Service employee and contains 
a request for a contribution to buy radio time for candidate Truman's speeches. 

One paragraph of the letter, which constitutes a very thinly veiled 
threat of reprisals against those who do not contribute, reads as follows: 
"Will not you, having enjoyed the opportunities of 
the Democratic Administration, help keep it in office by 
teaking a liberal contribution for the President to continue 
a limited number of important broadcasts?" 
This whole sordid episode is additional evidence of v/hat can happen when 
the ethics of the Pendergast Machine become dominant in Washington. 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 

II 

48 



L 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENU* 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E 6^ 



FOR RELEASE 



#86 



IMMEDIATE 



October 18, 19^8 



Herbert Brownell, Jr., Campaign Manager for the Dewey-Warren 

Ticket, announced today that G-overnor Dewey will make a major campaign 

address in Cleveland, Ohio, on Wednesday, October 27th. The address 

will be broadcast over the full N3C Network: 

9:00 - 9*30 PM, EST 

8:00 - 8:30 PM, CST 

7:00 - 7O0 PM, MST & PDT 

6:00 - 6:30 PM, PST 



---.-oooooo 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E 815 

FOR RELEASE 

' ^ ^5 For HORNING papers of 

MONDAY, Oct. IS, ljlttl 

Veterans throughout the country were reminded in a new 
appeal distributed from Republican headquarters today that "conjoined 
operations", as necessary for winning the peace as winning the war, call 
for election of a Republican Congress to support Dewey and Warren when 
they assume thoir now responsibilities after the first of the year. 

Prepared under direction of National Chairman Harry W. 
Colmory of Republican Veterans for Dewey and Warren, the loaflet was made 
public by Republican National Campaign Chairman, Herbert Brownell, Jr. 
It is illustrated with Gketchoe and is educational in character. 

"In wartime combined operations were the key to victory", 
the message says. "It took everything we had to win the war- — planes, guns, 
ships, plus courageous men and women onlisted in a common cause. 

"Renonber. ..in war men plus weapons plus teamwork equals 

victory. 

"In peacetime combined operations are oqually necessary. 
It will take everything we have to win the peace: The President, plus the 
Congress, plus a patriotic and united paoplo, working together to save the 
victory for froodora and human rights won at such sacrifice in war, but in 
danger again now. 

"We need cmbined operations in Government. Under our 
Constitution the House of Representatives originates all appropriation bills 
and enacts all Federal laws jointly with the Senate, which is jointly re- 
sponsible with tho President for foreign policy and confirms important 
Presidential appointments. She Prosident, as the Nation's Chief Executive, 
enforces the laws, guides national policy, directs foreign affairs and is 
Coranander-in-Chiof of the armed services. 

"Today, at election tine, your \ r ote is needed for 'Combined 
Operations U.S.A.' The times call for teamwork by the people, tho President 
the Congress. Give Dewey and Warren a Congress which will work with then for 
a -aeaceful and prosperous America, Roncriber, a united Government means a 
strong United States. 'A house divided against itself shall fall." 1 

3ID 




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Republican National Committee 



W 315 



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WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 
10 



a 



FOR 




LEAS 



T-u 



& 



48 



Morning Papers, 
Monday, October 25, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 PM.SS 1 : 
Sunday, October 24, 1948 



STATEMENT 3Y WILLIAM 0. BULLITT, FORMER AMBASSADOR TO 
THE SOVIET UUIQN, AND 20MEB. AMBASSADOR TO FRANCE. 



In spite of our victory in the Second World War, we face today a straggle 
not for security but for suvival. For this bitter fruit of victory, we have to 
thank the men in our national administration who based our foreign policy on 
twin delusions! (l) that the Soviet Union was a "peace loving democracy"? 
(2) that the Chinese Communists were "mere agrarian reformers who had no con- 
nection with Moscow." 

Cur deluded government, attempting to appease Stalin, -permitted him to 
dominate 130 million free Euro-oeans and 120 million free Chinese. Today Stalin 
is strivir.g to control all that remains free of Europe and all the Far East, in 
order ultimately to launch against us overwhelming masses of men and machines. 
In consequence, our country is in greater neril than at any time in our national 
history. 

We did not have to be in our present danger. We could have won the peace 
as well as the war. But our national administration was incompetent to protect 
the vital interests of the United States. It is equally incompetent today. I 
have confidence in the ability of Governor Dewey. Therefore, I, - a lifelong 
Democrat - advocate his election., 



* * * * * * * 



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Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E ft i 
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FOR RELEASE 

Release - Immediate 
October 25, 1948 

WASHINGTON — As a last ir.inute effort to revive the waning interest of 
colored voters for the Democrat Party, President Truman can he expected this 
week to make a belated speech on civil rights, Val J. Washington, assistant 
Republican campaign manager, declared today. 

Mr. Washington said the basis for this prediction was the lack of re- 
sponse the President got to his recent conciliatory remarks in North Carolina, 
made with the hope of recapturing the South. 

"Aware of his failure to do this, Mr. Truman realizes that he has no other 
course of action left but to reiterate his civil rights urogram in the hope of 
picking up colored votes in Hew York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana^ 
Michigan and California where interest in his party within the colored electorate 
has all but died," the assistant campaign manager explained. 

He added! 

"I predict this strategy will fail miserably, and the President will be- 
come just another victim of the old Democrat habit of 'too little, too late. 
His silence on Civil Rights for the past five weeks has astounded his most 
ardent followers.' 

"It will fail because Mr. Truman's refusal to follow through on his so- 
called civil rights urogram, launched last February, has revealed what his real 
motives were in the first place — votes." 

Mr. Washington said the day has passed when the Negro electorate can be 
'taken in* by candidates who blov hot and then cold on issues and try to make 
up for their shortcomings by resorting to last-minute speeches on civil rights. 

"On November 2, colored voters are going to vote for Governor Dewey and 
Governor Warren, the Republican candidates for President and Vice President, and 
thereby cast their lot \ ith men whose records show that they get things done in 
their own states and can be depended ution to get things done in Washington. 



Republican National CtprwiT^EE 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 



N[ U| O DTI CROC «-«»»»».-• «vc«u* ^ |fV 

L II ft t L L ft L WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 1 1 «0 



io 



£ 815 

^^ FOR RELEASE r9H 

Radio 6:00 P.M. 
Saturday, October 23, 19/+8 

Sunday Morning Papers, 
OctoVr 24, 1948 

Text of telegram from Herbert Brownell, Jr., to Senator William 3. Jenner, 
Republican of Indiana, Chairman of the Speakers Bureau of the Republican National 
Committee. 

"I have your request that you "be relieved of active responsibility for the 
conduct of the Speakers Bureau for the remaining week of the Campaign, I agree 
completely with the statement which you have made to me that the national speaking 
program is now organized to such an extent that very little remains to be done 
except in the matter of minor day-by-day adjustments, and I am quite sure that 
your Executive Assistant, George Stewart, will be able to handle such matters in a 
completely satisfactory manner. I am, of course, counting upon you to return to 
Washington either immediately tefore, or after, the election, at your convenience 
to wind up such affairs of the Speakers 3ureau as may be outstanding at that time. 
Naturally, I appreciate your eagerness to continue your long record of active 
participation in Indiana campaigns, and I am confident that what you may do between 
now and November 2nd in Indiana will contribute very materially to building up 
the large majorities which we expect in that State for the National and the State 

tickets. 

"May I take this opportunity to express to you my gratitude for the outstanding 
service you have rendered to the De^ey-Warren Ticket, and to all Republican candi- 
dates everywhere by your eminently efficient conduct of the Speakers Bureau, since 
you came to Washington on August 14th. I realize that you have given very generous- 
ly of your time and abilities to insure the gr^at victory we expect on November 2nd'.' 



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11 

w 

48 



ns 



Sunday Morning, 
October 24, 1948 



Washington, D. C., October 23, 1948. Val J. Washington, assistant national 
Republican campaign manager, today accused Walter H. Aiken, Atlanta, Gai, Negro 
contractor, of "being guilty of inexcusable ignorance." 

Washington was referring to a statement made by Aiken in addressing a con- 
ference here of presidents of Negro land-grant colleges in the South, 

Aiken attacked Governor Dewey's record in New York, 

"It happens," said Washington, "that Negroes are tetter housed in New York 
State than possibly any State in the country. This is largely due to housing 
legislation sponsored by Governor Dewey, Governor Dewey's State axroroved legis- 
lation permitting insurance companies to build homes at a reasonable rental figure 
for middle-class citizens, 

"Not only that, but the State also gave tax exemptions to these developments, 
to keep down rents. It also advances money to cities of the State for slum 
clearance projects. Governor Dewey long has realized that the privilege of living 
in decent homes is one of the important needs of Negroes not only in New York State, 
but everywhere," 



****** 



Republican National Committee 

NEWS RELEASE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



#g£ 



K-E 815 -^ 

. z « 5 FOR ■"■$**■/' « 

! ' 18 

Release Morning Tapers - 

October 24, 1948 
WASHINGTON, D.G.— -The nations high school students favor Governor Dewey for 
President by a decided majority. 

Ralph S. Becker, Chairman of the Young Republican National Federation 
and an attorney from Port Chester, New York and Washington, D.C., pointed to 
the results of Scholastic Magazines ' Institute of Public Opinion Poll released 
today as evidence of a new trend in Politics. He stated that young people are 
becoming more and more serious minded about the problems of government} that they 
no longer are willing to sit on the sidelines when their future security is at 
stake. 

The question posed.' to 70,531 students from all sections of the country 
was as follows s "If you were of voting age today, which candidate would you 
vote for in the coming Presidential election?" 46.29$ of those polled favored 
Governor Dewey as against 38,76$ who favored Truman. The remaining 14.95$ of 
those included in the poll scattered their preferences among Wallace, Thurmond 
and Norman Thomas. Becker pointed to the small percentage who had no opinion 
as indicative of the thought being given to the campaign by the country's teen- 
agers. 

Becker, in referring to his travels of more than 150,000 miles up and 
down the country in the last two years, stated that he had always endeavored to 
determine just what young people wanted and what they thought of extreme govern- 
mental regulation and abdication of responsibility to the state. He summed up 
his conclusion as follows : 

"Young people want to stand on their own feet, to go ahead, to be 
productive, to amount to something, and to carve out careers for themselves. 
The Democrat Administration has not given them this opportunity; has only 
provided frustration and confusion. This yearning for freedom and respeot 
is a basic reason why the nation's youth are supporting Governors Dewey and 
"arren. 11 



NEWS RELEASE 






Republican Natio nal Co mmittee 

1337 CONNECTlCUrpWENOC, P 11 
WASHINGTON II D. C. J 8 



• lO 



dJ* #S7 



FOR RELEASE 



Immediate 
October 20, 1948 

Governor Thomas 3 # Dewey will deliver major canmaign addresses in Boston, 
Massachusetts, on the evening of Thursday, October 28, and in Hew York City on 
Saturday, October 30, it was announced today by Herbert Browne 11, Jr., Camoaign 
Manager for the Dewey-Warren Ticket. It was al30 announced that Governor Farl Warren 
ifill deliver a nationally-broadcast address from San Francisco on Friday, October 29. 

Governor Dewey's speech in Boston in the Boston Arena will be carried over the 

full network of the Columbia Broadcasting System as follows: 

9:00 - 9:30 FM, FST 

8:00 - 8:30 FM, CST 

7:00 - 7;30 FM, M5T & PDT 

6:00 - 6:30 FM, FST 

Governor Dewey's soeech on October 1 30 in Madison Square Garden will be broad- 
cast over the full National Broadcasting Comoany ITet^ork as follows: 

9:30 - 10:00 PM, 1ST 

8:30 - 9:00 FM, CST 

7:30 - 8:00 FM, MST & PDT 

6:30 - 7;00 PM, FST 

Governor Warren's address from San Francisco will be carried over the National 

Broadcasting Comoany network as follows: 

10:00 - 10:30 PM, FST 
9:00 - 9:30 FM, CST 
8:00 - 8:30 PM, MST & PDT 
7:00 - 7:30 PM, PST 



t************:*?*****)*** ..«****** 



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X-E 315 



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Republican National Committer 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



u #88 



FOR REi.KA;Hl& 



Morning Papers, 

Friday, October 15, 1948 

Radio Release, 6PM, cSI 



SP£iiCH OF GOVERNOR &iSL HARRSM OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican f'ominse for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Tacoma, Washington, 
3:30 P.M., PST, Thursday, October U, 1948) 



Mr. Chairman and ray fellow-Americans: 

It is good to be back on the Pacific Coast. V)e have had a great trip. 
I wish everyone could see what we have seen in 31 states and in the more than 
100 communities we have visited. 

It Is impossible to see the vast expanse and diversity of this country 
without understanding why it is truly great and without realizing how much 
greater it can be in the future. 

If every part of it is encouraged to strive for its fullest development 
and to mesh its activities with every other section there will be literally no 
limit to what we can do with the strength of our tdal economy. 

One of your greatest resources, or assets, is your strategic location 
here on the Pacific Coast. No one could come to this great Puget Sound, where 
all the ships of the world could be nestled with room for more, without real- 
izing that this is a natural gateway to the Orient. Here it is on the Great 
Circle along which the trade of two continents can be cprriad on to an extent 
be^nnd our imagination. These routes of trade open ud to this area a billion 
people living on the rim of the immense Pacific Basin. 

The peoole of the Orient are stirring today. They have seen a great deal 
during the years of war. They have been part of stirring events. They have 
watched troops going forth with equipment, supplies and mechanical devices 
never seen in those parts of the world before. They have met top flight organi- 
zers and technicians from this and other countries. 

Because of what they have seen and learned, these peonle are beginning 
to think of what can be done to develop their own regions and increase their 
standard of living. They know that we have what they are looking for - the 
kind of help that will give them a start along the same lines. 

And where could they more naturally turn than to their friends on this 
Pacific Coast? Vie are close to them by modern standards. We have already 
tried to be cooperative with most of these peonle and they realize that we caji 



Republican National Committee 

1337 CONNE 



NEWS RELEASE 'ZZZZSmmii 



p COOT '* 4« 

X-E 815 K=2 ' 

IX)R RELEASE 

■ z^z 

A.M. Papers. Saturday, Oct. 16, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

SPEECH OP GOVERNOR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Eugene, Oregon 
8:00 P.M. , PST, Friday, Oct. 15, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and my fellov Americans: 

Ladies and gentlemen, it is fine to he back on the pacific Coast and in our 
good-neighbor state of Oregon. One month ago today we started on this campaign trip. 
Looking into the future, it appeared to be of almost endless duration — 31 consecu- 
tive days and nights on a train with a speech to prepare for every night and 100 more 
informal ones sandwiched in between. 

But the time has gone by amazingly fast. It has been unbelievably pleasant. 
We have been in 32 states from border to border and from coast to coast. Everywhere 
we have received a warm-hearted welcome. People of both parties have come to visit 
with me. They have given me a fine American hearing. I don't know that all of thea 
intend to vote for my ticket, but that is not the important part of it. The import- 
ant thing is that they were sufficiently interested in their government to want to 
hear both sides. Their minds were not closed. They were willing to give both sides 
a chance to present their cause. There has been no evidence of blind partisanship 
among them. They have been cordial. They have been attentive. They have been 
thoughtful and I believe prayerful concerning the greft problems of our Nation. 

They are obviously concerned about some of our domestic problems. Every house- 
wife, every workman is concerned about the cost of living and the shortages that 
enter into that problem. They are concerned about the s tability of our economy and 
about their own social security in a jittery world. 

There is apprehension in every home concerning our relations with other 
nations of the world, particularly with Russia, There is uneasiness over the infil- 
tration of Communism and other "isms" into our national life and even into our govern- 
ment. People are wondering whether the atomic age will be a blessing or a curse to 
mankind. They understand the frteful importance of what we do — and how we do it — 
in our foreign relations. They are anxious for the just and lasting peace we fought 
for and thought we had won over three years ago. They want international law and 
order because they realize that there can be no security for any nation, large or 
small, strong or weak, in a world beset by aggression. 

I am sure they want America to fully exercise its leadership for peace through 
the United Nations. But, until there is an adequate system of international law and 



Republican National Committee 

NEWS RELEASE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



Hit 



■ Z^S IX)U «f|E'--KAHJ5 

nelcase No, 13 TMMHI'll MlfflBMH Morning Blgos, Fsri&*y 

octo'o;r 3g>, 194b 

"Tho Peace for v/hich you fought" wan pictured to sorld war II 

veterans by the TS*cubliC£.n Veterens' Division today as a series of secret 

agreencnts - -I lch togathor spelled nppease>nent of Soviet Hussia "nd oroue-ht 

-bnut the preoant precTious international situation. 

The leaflet was mp.de public by national C»fipaira Ohairr.an 
Herbert Browrell, Jr. 

It w"s prepared -nc distributee by tha Vjtnr^m' division, 
ho-dtd by Director ;-:■ rry W. Colnery, forrw-r natior-1 conrnmnder of the 
.\nerlc-n .Locion, vho hns rsocisted ith hin r> < oz n othor o~st co ■- Anders 
oi' the Lepicn - nd '/FtJ, nnd 11 co-'n-ndors of thn Ali' r J''?S, 

According to tie Hepublican summary of A/;.u«c n forox^n policy 
results nntodatinr nhe present bi»p«rtl«nn forsi?n policy, the secret agree- 
ments ontortd into during anci follo-inar the war -orlced out this reyj 

Tahcran conference, ftcsoatof 1943 Geve Sussir 40 percent of 

Poland; ?'vj • rr.s rnu equipment to l'ito in i-.goslavia; -jno yielded to 
Sialic, ' '• tu:Ki.ii6 thet Gemsny'? industry ba destroyed, thug forcing the 
limited sfcittin So support Europe. 

Yalta Lo.if crencc, February 194b Cvvr. uuter Mongolia and tho 

Kurile; Iglfts to •fc.seJ.aj "approved Hussifin control of Port Art.eur pnd Q-iron, 
and '-f oho :."& 5.1 rntd through Mnnchurin. to the see; nil owed Russian ".nniep to 
ont-.;' Berlin first, "nd gave -iussi - three votrs to our one in the United 
Nations. 

-otcd=>m Conf.rencc, July 19<15 — -Gr.vo cassis control of B&stem 
G^nwny; of :>11 German *ssets ia .lUotriaj of all Horuva industries in t lis 
zone, plu-, 10 percent of t oso in the Western zone: "nd of '11 lend for 100 
•eiles Tourd Berlin, leaving the United St tes without ne'.ne of -cccss to 
ierlin oxco.ot by air. 

<Vo r poise at: en of toe I-.^ublicsn Party vss at Teher-n, Yalta 
or Eotso>m #- 'These agree.ncnts '-art? not p'.rt of tr>.e bi-p.. rti sen foreign 
policy" it is ct--tcd.. 

"Americ-n poiic^, unee? Qe._ocr- tic leadership has let -tu-si" 
becoi-.e - ; r big a t:.re;.'t to world .ie-ca nor. ag Eitler v s 1 . 



Republican National Committhh 

For mvtisxMBmriiw 



NEWS RELEASE »«"" wa »» ifly ft»«LplS 1948 

Radio Release^ 6 m, Mjl M ,, ZJ 



SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EARL "/ARHSH OF CALIFORNIA J* 

• S <\^ for uki.i^&bJj 48 

Republican Nominee for Vice Fresident 

(Prepared for delivery at Butte, Mont. 

9:00 p.m. MST, Tuesday, October 12, 1943) 



Mr. Chairman and my fellow-Americans: 

I am very happy to be with you tonight in Montana and ..n your 
city of Butte. This state has made a great contribution to the life 
of the nation. The copper ore you extract here has been vital for the 
winning of two world wars and it is still vital for the strength of 
the nation in peace. 

All day, as the train climbed the mountains, I have felt very 
much at home. Your state is much like mine. It is a big state. Your 
mountains, your ranches and irrigated farms, your towns where the 
pioneer spirit still prevails - all of these things make na feel that 
I have already come home. I am in the great western neighborhood 
where the possibilities for future development are almost beyond the 
imagination of any of us today. " T e have an empire in size and a 
treasure house of natural resources - vast resources that are 
essential to both our peacetime economy and to our national defense. 

i?e may see in our lifetime - certainly within our children's- 
as many as fifty million people settled in these eleven western states- 
with tens of thousands of farms and industries providing food and 
Jobs. There can be countless happy, contented homos if we plan now, 
not merely in terms of growth, but in terms of how we want to grow 
to mate life better for the millions who will one day be here. 

First of all, we must give attention to our natural re- 
sources. They are a trust given us for our children and the future 
security and welfare of the whole nation, '.'hat we do within the 
next few years - whether we conserve those resources or exhaust 
them through neglect or misuse - will largely determine the kind of 
a future we will have. 

Before the war we had the idea — most people did — that 
the resources of America were inexhaustible, "e seemed to think 
vie had all the ore we would ev»r need, that we could cut all the 
timber we wanted, and let our rivers carry millions of tons of good 
soil to the ocean without impairing our national strength. But 
during the war, when we used those resources faster than at any 
time in our history, we suddenly discovered that they are not 
inexhaustible. M began to realize that, if we expect to continue, 



m 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 815 
Z^5 



Republican National, Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



m 



FOR UKI.KASI? 



Sunday A. If. Papers 
October 17, 1948 



Washington, D. C. — Herbert Brownell, Jr., Republican National Campaign 
Manager, announced that Ralph E. Becker, Chairman of the Young Republican 
National Federation, Saturday started a speaking tour that will carry him 
into five states. 

Becker, an attorney from Port Chester, N. Y., and Washington, D. C, 
spoke in Winchester, Virginia yesterday and will make his second important 
stop in Memphis, Tennessee this afternoon. In Tennessee, Becker will take part 
in Young Republican activity in behalf of the candidacy of Carroll Reece for 
the U. S. Senate. Reece is a former member of Congress, and former Chairman 
of the Republican National Committee. 

Following the two day visit in Tennessee, Mr. Becker will fly to 
Wyoming. Enroute there will be stopovers at the airports of Little Rock, 
Arkansas, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and Denver, Colorado where he will talk 
with Young Republican delegations on behalf of Republican Congressional 
nominees in those states. In Wyoming he will stimulate Young Republican 
activity in behalf of Senator Edward V. Robertson. His first speaking en- 
gagement in Wyoming will take place on October 19th at Laramie. On October 
20th and 21st he will address rallies and meetings at Cheyenne. 

From Wyoming Becker will travel to Billings, Montana and the 

immediate vicinity where he will spend approximately two days aiding the 

campaign of Tom Davis, Republican Senatorial Nominee. 

From Montana Becker will return for a short stop in Sheridan, Wyoming 

and from there will go direct to Albuquerque, New Mexico and Santa Fe, where 

he will spend three days urging the election of Patrick J. Hurley. 

From New Mexico Becker will return to Washington, D. C. with a 

brief stopover in Kansas City to meet a delegation there. 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 815 

■ ^ • i if 



REPUBLICAN \\tio nai. Co mmittee 

1337 CONNECTICUT MVENUC I, II 



WASHINGTON 6,' D. C 



!« 



FOR RELEASE 

For release to the Press 
and Radio Thursday Morning 
October 21, 19W 

Address of Speaker Joseph W. Martin, Jr. of 
the House of Representatives at a Republican Rally in 
Beckley, West Virginia, on i.adnesday Evening, October 20, 19U8 

To be broadcast over the Mutual 3roadcasting Company network 
at 3:30 P.M., E.S.T. 



Ml 



It is a great privilege to coma to this vigorous and progressive 
state of West Virginia. I am happy to coin with you in this campaign to end 
confusion, chaos and wobbling in our national government and substitute an 
administration that will have common sonse and direction, an administration 
that will bring hope, peace and security to the American people. 

Many of you are employed in the vital industry of coal mining. You 
are a powerful factor in the building of a happier, a more contented and a 
better nation. You work hard and all thinking people have rejoiced in your 
climb to a self-respecting and honored place in our national life. Personally, 
I waa happy this year to contribute my small part to bringing peace to your 
industry and a aeserved pension when age forces you to retire. Industrial 
peace, just compensation, and a fair deal to both the worker and management 
is the foundation upon which we must build a better and happier America. 
Both labor and management have a common interest in maintaining relations that 
will bring prosperity to all. We must all work to this end, and I am con- 
fident we will do so. 

in the remaining ten days before election, let us all gird ourselves 

for the whirlwind finish. 

We seek a mandate from the American people which will be understood 

clearly the world around. 

And that mandate will be reinforced nanyf old if you send Chapman 
Revercor.b back to the United States Senate by a thumping majority. 

We will need his able statesmanship and his robust Americanism in 
the Senate to help enact the legislative program of the Dewey-Warren Adminis- 
tration — a program which will aim to put mighty America back on the road 
to abundance, security and peace. 

Of course, you will want to re-elect those four fine, patriotic 
American Congressmen, Francis Love, Melvin Snyder, Edward Rohrbough and 
Hubert Ellis not only because of their record but that West Virginia will 



NEWS RELEASE 



■ M5 



f : ll 

Republican National CJ&mmittee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENU| 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



#<N 



IX Hi RKLKASE 



Morning newspapers of 
Sunday, October 24, 19^8 

Radio 6:00 P.M. , 
Saturday, October 23, 1948 



ST-fcTEfSOT BY HZEB3RT BR0W1CLL, JR. .OhMPAlGH MANAGER 0? TIE D3W3Y-WARR31T 
CAMPAIGN: 

Attempts of George Ifcrrlson, director of the Democrat i&tional Committee's 
Labor Jivision and national chairman of the Lr.bor for Truman and 3arkley Com- 
mittee, to arouse the interost of rank and file union members in the campaign 
for his candidates are backfiring, Herbert Brownell, Jr., Dewey-Warren Campaign 
Manager, declared today. 

"An increasing number of union nenbers and local labor officials in indus- 
trial communities throughout the country are repudiating the endorsement of 
Truman and Barkley by a few national union officials who, two years ago, were de- 
nouncing their candidates of today," Mr. Brownell said. 

He cited as the latest example of this trend an announcement made in Chicago 
Friday by William McFetridge, President of the Building Service Employees Inter- 
national Union, of the formation of an Illinois Labor for Dewey and Warren Com- 
mittee. A partial list of the Committee shows active support of the Dewey-Warren 
Ticket by 25 CIO, AFL, Railroad Brotherhood and independent union officials rep- 
resenting over 400,000 union members in Illinois cities. 

Mr. Brovmell recalled statements made by Harrison and other union officials, 
including Philip Murray, CIO president, A. P. Whitney, president of the Brother- 
hood of Pailway Trainmen, and Michael J. Quill, -president of the CIO Transport 
Workers Union, denouncing President Truman's demand of May 25, 1946, that Congress 
grant him the dictatorial authority to draft striking workers into the armed 
forces. 

"Republican members in the United States Senate opposed Democrat Majority 
Leader Berkley's efforts to obtain passage of legislation granting the President 
this dictatorial authority," Mr. Brownell said. "Republican Senators, some of 
whom are being opposed for reelection by a few national labor officials and their 
political organizations, were successful in killing the proposal. They rightly 
placed the blame for the breakdown in collective bargaining and mediation upon 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 815 



Republican National Committee 

U 



ISS7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 




TOR 4 fiEfaAfl rf8 



Saturday, October 23, 1948 upon 
filing of report with Cleric of 
House of Representatives, 
(approximately noon) 



An unprecedented number of small contributions which promise to set an all- 
time high in the number of Republican Party contributors made up a surprising 
portion of funds collected by the Republican National Committee since September 1, 
according to a report filed today by James S. Kemper, Treasurer of the Committee, 
with the Clerk of the House of Representatives. 

Some idea of the support of the Republican campaign by the general public can 
be gained by the fact that of the 3,657 individual contributions listed by Mr. 
Kemper, 2,322 are of $25 or less and the breakdown shows thet 233 contributions of 
from $1 to $2 have been received by the Committee. 

The report also reveals the following categories of contributions: 177 of $2; 
35 from $2 to $3; 46 from $3 to $4; 591 from $5 to $10; 679 from $10 to $20; 
100 from $20 to $25, and 461 of $25. 

In the bracket of contributions ranging from $25 to $100 the report shows that 
374 were made, of which 41 were from $27,50 to $50, and 333 were from $50 to $100. 

Comparatively few "large" contributions are listed by Mr. Kemper ir. the report 
which includes all collections up to and including October 18. The number of con- 
tributions in amounts from $100 up to the legal limit of $5,000 are as follows: 
350 of $100; 204 from $125 to $250: 23 of $300; 21 from $300 to $400; 117 of 
$500; 17 from $550 to $1,000; 114 of $1,000; 18 from $1,000 to $2,000; 24 of 
$2,000; 18 of $2,500; 39 of $3,000 and 13 of from $3,000 to $5,000, 

The amounts shown in the report exceeding $5,000 reflect the National Com- 
mittee's shares of state-collected funds. 

Although it is impossible to determine the exact number of contributors making 
up the National Committee share of state-collected funds, it is established that 
the average personal contribution in the states will be even smaller than that re- 
flected in the national report. 

Despite the broad extension of the party financial support base, which Mr, 
Kemper says '•rill be the greatest in the party's history, the partial report 
indicates the party finances thus far are falling short of the budgeted goal for 
the campaign. 



NEWS RELEASE 



* 



£ 815 



Republican Natio: 




-JLS 



!337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE lO 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 
lO 



«H 



FOR RELEASE 



Morning Newspapers 
Monday, Sept. 20, 1948 



Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg will deliver one of the most 
important addresses of the Dewey-Warren Campaign the evening of 
Monday, October k t it was announced by Herbert Brownell, Jr., 
Campaign Manager for the Dewey-Warren Ticket, 

The Senator will speak over the facilities of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System from 8:00, to 8:30 P.M., Eastern Standard Time, 
over Station WE OP, Washington, He .will be heard in the Central 
Standard Time zone 7jQ0 to 78 30 P.M.; in the Mountain Standard Time 
zone 6?00 to 6:30 P.M.; in the Pacific Standard Time zone 9:00 to, 
9:30 P.M., and in the Pacific Daylight Time zone 10:00 to 10:30 P.M. 

The address will be under the auspices of the Republican 
national Committee. 



• «O0-" 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-E 815 



Republican National Committee 



IS37 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASH1N 




FOR 






Afternoon Papers 
October 28, 1948 



Mrs. Mabel Walker Willebrandt, who as Assistant Attorney General of the 
United States from 1921 to 1929 was one of the first women appointed by a 
Republican President to Federal public office, today issued a formal endorse- 
ment of the Dewey-Warren Ticket. In a statement issued through Mrs. Robert W. 
Macauley, Assistant Chairman of the Republican national Committee, 
Mrs. Willebrandt said: 

"I know that the only way the United States Government can be strong 
enough to command influence for world peace and bring fair play and opportunity 
for our own people is by having experienced men of integrity and purpose in its 
top positions. 

"Governors Dewey and Warren: 

(a) have both made their way up by hard work and honest living; 

(b) each has served as a distinguished fighter against crime and 
graft that weaken democracies; . 

(c) neither has become rich in public office, but each has proven 
his executive ability by administering the government of a 
great state well; and 

(d) each has been strong and wise enough in the true values of life 
to live normally, and to maintain an ideal Christian home and 
family. 

"They are partners in integrity. We need their partnership in Washington 

to command world respect and leadership; to clean out fumblers, duplications and 

the riff-raff in government; and to get a dollar's worth of good government for 

each dollar of taxes." 

********* 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



X-E-frW 




1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
HINGTON 6. D. C. 



W2> 



J« 

FOR RELEASE 

Immediate Release 
Thursday, Sept. 9, 1948 



STATEMENT BY HUGH SCOTT, CHAIRMAN OF 
THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 



It is highly gratifying that Elmo Roper has come to the conclusion that the 
Dewey-Warren Ticket is so far ahead in the Presidential Campaign that no purpose 
is to he served hy reporting the trend of public opinion in the future. Mr. 
Roper's success in predicting the outcomes of previous elections makes his announce- 
ment today all the more impressive. It should he recalled that in the 1936 election 
his predictions differed from the actual results hy 1.1$ and that in 1940 his 
predictions were only one half of 1$ in variance with the actual result, while in 
1944 he came within three-tenths of if of calling the exact results of the ballot- 
ing. 

I seriously hope that Mr. Roper will change his mind and continue to report 
his findings, for while his poll shows the National Renublican Ticket leading hy 
almost 13 points, and show3 the determination of the American people to get rid of 
the present Administration in Washington, it also shows that a great number of 
voters have not yet made up their minds. These voters are entitled to have the 
issues of the campaign put before them, and I hope Mr. Roper will make available 
to the public the results of future trends when both candidates are actually in 
the field. 

Despite Mr. Roper's announcement that he is going to stop reporting the trend 
of the present campaign, I am not disposed to call upon Republicans to regard the 
election as over. This is no time to relax our efforts to build up the biggest 
majority in history for the Dewey-Warren Ticket, and for the many Senatorial, 
Gubernatorial and Congressional candidates who are running on that ticket. It is 
highly important that when Governor Dewey takes office next January, as President 
of the United States, he shall have the sup-oort of substantial working majorities 
in the Senate and the House. Every position on a championship team must be filled 
with loyal, competent and qualified members. Therefore, in the midst of the 
jubilation which will inevitably result from Mr. Roper's announcement, I wish to 
call upon all Republicans to increase their efforts to elect Republican candidates 
to every office at stake this je ar. There are several reasons for this request, 

1. While I have every confidence that the Dewey-Warren Ticket will be elected, 
I never regard an election as over until election day, 

2. Overconfidenco can lose an election. Everyone who wants the Dewey-Warren 



NEWS RELEASE 



y^ 815 

■2^5* 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



FOR R 




n 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELFASE^ 
September 9, 1948 



Campaign Manager Herbert 3rownell f Jr., and Associate Campaign Manager 
Mrs. Charles T7. Teis, Jr., of the Dewey-Warren Ticket today announced the 
appointment of Mrs, J. 7* Hunt of Oswego, Illinois, as Assistant to the Campaign 
Manager for the Midwest in charge of women's activities. Mrs. Hunt will assume 
her duties immediately and will "be associated with A. T. Howard, the Midwest 
Campaign Manager at the Chicago headquarters, 33 N. LaSalle Street. 

"I am very pleased to join with Mr. Brownell in announcing the appointment 
of Mrs, Hunt as an Assistant in the Campaign Division of the Midwest headquarters," 
said Mrs. Weis. "Mrs, Hunt is an experienced worker in the Republican ranks and 
is well qualified for the responsibilities of this post," 

Mrs. Hunt is one of the Party's most active and distinguished leaders. She 
has "been identified with Republican organizational work for many years, serving as 
a precinct commit teewoman in her home township, as county vice chairman, and as a 
member of the Illinois State Central Committee, In 1944, she was a delegate at 
large from Illinois to the Republican National Convention. 

Mrs. Hunt also has had an active part in the development and activities of 
the Federation of Somen's Republican Clubs. She first served as president of the 
Illinois State Federation for several years and since early 1947 has been chairman 
of the Membership Extension Committee of the National Federation, an organization 
of half a million members in 42 states. Mrs. Hunt is a native of Ottawa, Illinois, 
and attended Pleasant View College. Her only son, Richard P. Hunt, served 
overseas in the Army Air Forces of World War II. 

************* 



Republican National. Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6. 



NEWS RELEASE 

If C | 11 

" FOR RELEASE WO 

■ <-? Morning Papers 

Monday, Oct, 25, 1948 

Radio Release 

6:00 P.M., DST Oet. 24 

Dewev-'arren Headquarters today announced that it {%& caused a noil to "be 
tiken in Rhode Island, with special reference tc the Presidential possibilities. 
The results of this poll indicate that Governor Dewey will carry the State with 53$ 
of the 2—oarty vote if those actually vote who have already decided on a candidate. 
However, nearly 20yi of the Rhode Island voters are still undecided and this unusual- 
ly large group can be the deciding factor, it was -oointed out. Governor Dewey's 
itinerary for the final week of the Canroaign calls for two atrcearances in the 
State on October 39, the first to be at Providence during the noon hour, and the 
second at 'festerly. 

Fifty-two t;er cent of those still undecided claim they voted for Roosevelt 
in 1944, and more than half of this undecided groura regard themselves a9 "indepen- 
dents." Moreover, of those \tfho so describe themselves but have already decided 
uoon a candidate, the largest number has re-oorted its intention of voting for 
Governor Dewey. 

Those who favor Governor Dewey have listed as their principal reasons for so 
doing, first, the need for a change; second, their imoression of favorable qualities 
and characteristics, such as his efficiency, his administrative ability, and his 
refutation in public office. 

The attitude of the voters on the Presidential contest is carried over in be- 
half of Tom P. Hazard, Republican nominee for the United States Senate, the largest 
number of voters indicating an intention to vote for Hazard, giving as reasons 
therefor the need for a Republican Senator to work with a Republican Administration 
and the need for a change. Those who strongly favor Hazard indicate doubts about 
the Administration's handling of our relations with Russia and Communist infiltra- 
tion in the Government. 



NEWS RELEASE 



315 
1°IS 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 

to 



rJ/01 



FOR RELEASE 



Morning Newspapers 
Monday, October 25, 1948 

Radio Release 

6:00 P.M., EST, Oct. 24th. 

Herbert Brownell, Jr., Campaign Director of the Dewey-Warren Campaign 
Headquarters, today issued a statement calling for the election of Carroll Reece 
as Republican United States Senator from Tennessee. Heartened by news of the 
enormous crowds which have followed the campaign of Reece and Roy Acuff , candidate 
for Governor, Dewey-'iarren Headquarters believe that Governor Dewey will carry 
Tennessee and that Mr. Reece will be elected to the Senate. Mr. Brownell 1 s state- 
ment follows: 

"I am greatly interested in reports reaching Headquarters from 
Tennessee concerning the election campaign of Carroll Reece, our Repub- 
lican candidate for the United States Senate, and Roy Acuff, our candi- 
date for Governor, The election of Carroll Reece, our former national 
Chairman, can bring to the Senate an experienced legislator who has served 
more than twenty-five years in the Congress of the United States. He 
knows the legislative process. He has a keen appreciation of our 
national problems. I know that the tens of thousands of Tennessee 
voters who favor a Republican Administration will also desire a Repub- 
lican Senate and a Republican House of Representatives to work with our 
new Administration commencing in January. Unity of action between the 
V/hite House and the Congress can assist our efforts for peace, for effi- 
cient government and for the advancement of the interests of our people 
throughout the nation and in Tennessee." 



---oo --- 



Republican National Committee 



Nr "ii e nriracr ,337 CONNECT,CUT avenue 

two KtLtAot 



WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 




*"E 8i5 FOR RELEASE _ 48 



^-<=f5" 



for release 

Immediate Release 
October 13, 1948 

Nationally broadcast addresses on behalf of the Republican Ticket, scheduled 

for the next few days, include the following: 

V f 3d.. Oct. 13 

Represe nt ative Ch arles A. Hall°ck , Majority Leader of the 
Hous6 of Representatives, from lit. Vernon, Illinois, under the 
auspices of the TIational Re-rmblicrn Congressional Committee, 
over full ABC network: 

9:30-10:00 P.M., B.S.T. 

8:30- 9:00P.M., 3.S.T., C.5.T., M.S.T., P.D.T. & P.S.T. 

Thurs.. Oct. 14 

Governor Thomas E. Dewey . Kansas City, Missouri, Municipal 
Auditorium, over full CBS network; 

9:30-10:00 P.M., S.S.T. 

8:30- 9:00 P.M., C.S.T. 

7:30- 8:00 P.M., M.S.T., & P.D.T. 

6:30- 7:00 P.M., P.S.T. 

Fri.. Oct. 15 

Gover nor Thomas 5. Pe^e y, St. Paul, Minnesota, will address 
the National Coi.vuntion of the National Federation of Somen's Retjub- 
lican Clubs, over full ABC network: 

9:30- 10:00 P.M., S.S.T. 

8:30- 9:00 P.M., CcS.T. 

7:30- 8:00 P.M., M.S.T. & P.D.T. 

6:30- 7:00 P.M., P.S.T. 

'■ted. Oct. 30 

Speake r Jos e ph g. .Martin, Jr ., "Beckley, West Virginia, under 
the auspices of the l r rtional Republican Congressional Committee, 
over full Mutual network: 

8i3C- 8:55 P.M., ^.S.T. 

7:30- 7:55 P.M., C.S.T. 

6:30- 6:55 P.M., M.S.T. & P.D.T. 

8:30- 8:55 P.M., P.S.T. 

Tues.. Oct. 26 

Governor Th onr,s.3. De'j*y . Chicago, Illinois, over full 1TBC 
na t- -ork : 

10:00-10:30 P.M., E.S.T. 
9:00- 9:30 P.M., C.S.T. 
8:00- 8.30 P.M., McS. n . 



i 



Republican National Committee 



EWS RELEASE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 






4/03 



PO.FKELE.ifeE 

'MM Ik *^ 

48 

Morning Newspapers, Tues. Sept. 28, 1948 
Radio delease 6:00 P.M., Mon. Sept. 27, 1948 



EXCERPTS FROM A FRONT PAGE EDITORIAL 
APPEARING IN THE FORTHCOMING ISSUES OF 
THE "AFRO-aHERICaN" NEWSPAPERS , SIGlliD 
BY CARL MURPHY, PRESIDENT OF THE aFRO- 
AliERICAN COMPANY 






"Speaking in Los Angeles last week Governor Thomas E. Dewey remarked, 'Three 
years after our victory in the great war we have not found peace. 1 

"One theory is that we have anneesed the Russians too often and too much. 
Another is that we should get out of Europe. A third argument, and one that appeals 
most strongly to me, is that we have the second team playing against the Russians. 
"In next November's election let us put in the first team. 

MB. TRUMAN AND CONGRESS 
"Mr. Truman's administration has not only kept us on the anxious seat abroad 
but it has not been able to bring us peace in Washington. 

"The Congress the people elected in 1946, Mr. Truman says, is the worst, save 
one, in the history of the nation. 

"That Congress which he says was the absolute worst was the one we elected 
in 1866, following the death of Abraham Lincoln. Andrew Johnson, Vice President, 
succeeded Mr. Lincoln. 

"Mr. Truman should have thought twice before he condemned that Congress. 
It approved the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution which gave full 
citizenship and equal rights to colored people. 

"The situation in 1866 offers a deadly parallel to what we have today. 
"Abraham Lincoln, a great war President, died as did Franklin Roosevelt. 
"History often repeats itself. The Vice President, Andrew Johnson, like 
Mr. Truman, disagreed violently with Congress. In fact Congress sought to impeach 
Mr. Johnson. This year there was talk also of impeaching Mr. Truman. 

"Then came the election of 1868, exactly as we are now to have an election 
in 1948. And the people then re-elected the Congress. They declined even to re- 
nominate President Johnson. 

"After all we voters choose both the President and the Congress. We expect 
them to operate as a team. When they quarrel like alley cats the best thing to do 
is what we did in 1868 — namely, to put a new man in the White House." 

(more) 



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Republican National Committee 



1S37 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 

.ijj 10 



*w 



X-E 815 
. ~7L <?£ 



FOR RELfaASE^ ^ 

Morning Papers, •"' ■$ 

Sat. Oct. 2, 1948 
Hadio He lease 6:00 PM 
Friday, Oct. 1,1948 



TEXT OF THE ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS E. DEMY, 
REFJiillCAN NOMINEE FOE PRESIDENT, DELI^RSD AT THE JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, CKEYEUNE, WYO., FRIDAY EVENING, 
OCTOBER 1, 1948. 

Caring the last two weeks, I have been travelling over the length and breadth 
of America. It has been a wonderful trip- — an inspiring experience. Ours is a truly 
magnificent land -- every mile of it. But one thing has impressed me above all 
others. From Albany to the Pacific Ocean and back over the mountains here to 
Cheyenne — everywhere — our people are eager to install in Washington an adminis- 
tration that will unite America. 

We have a big job ahead of us, and it's all America's job. The guns fell 
silent three years ago but we still have the -oeace to win. Today, a dark shadow 
hangs over the tense state of world affairs. The Soviet Union seems to be opposing 
all the legal means of solving international differences. Our future and the peace 
of the world are staked on how united the people of America are. It will be our 
unity as a nation, above everything else, which will discourage a new aggression 
in the world and which will give our own people the courage and confidence they need 
to solve their own pressing problems. 

My purpose in this campaign has been to deepen and strengthen the bonds which 
hold our people together. It has been from the outset, and it will continue to be, 
a campaign for national unity. 

We are in the process of changing our leadership here to build a better America 
and to unite our people behind a government that leads from strength and strives 
for peace built on justice. Nothing can long divide our country; nothing can so 
unite us as a crisis created by those about us or those across the seas who do not 
understand the spirit of America. 

I pledge to you that we will carry out a foreign policy based upon the firm 
conviction that we can have peace. I pledge to you that policy will be brought to 
life by capable men and women who have the vigor, the knowledge, and the experience 
to wage peace successfully. I pledge to you that they will be immediately brought 
into our government when your next administration takes office on January 20th. 

World Communism is on the march. Freedom-loving nations left weak and hungry 
by the war are being terrorized by a disciplined band of men bent on undermining 
freedom everywhere. Their weapons are, first, falsehood and propaganda; then, 
sabotage and treason. Their agents and those they have deceived into following 



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Republican National Committee 



X-E 815 



'11 



US7 CONNECTietHM 

WASHINGTctt 8. O. C. 

IX MR RELEASE 



For morning papers, Tues. Sept. 38, 1948 
Eadio release 6:00 P.m., E.S.T. 



'< 



SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EaRL V.'ARRSN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Springfield, Mass. 
at 9:15 P.M. .2.S.T. , Monday", Sept. 27, 1948) 



Mr, Chairman and fellows-Americans: 

When a Calif ornian steps on the soil of Massachusetts, he feels that he is stand- 
ing in the birthplace of human liberty. At Plymouth Rock, human beings - seeking an 
asylum from oppression, found it here and began that experiment in government that 
has become the United States of America. 

Here was shed the first blood of the American revolution. Here was fired the 
shot heard around the world — the signal that set off the historic revolt against a 
governmental regime that failed to recognize the longing of our early settlers for 
freedom, human dignity and a voice in their government. 

Here in New England the faith, the industry and the suffering of our early 

Colonists firmly established on this continent two great propositions of the utmost 

importance, not only to those who folloved them, but to the world. 

four years before the signing of the Constitution - 
Seventy-seven years before the Civil Mar -/four years before your State became a 

member of the Union, your courts handed down one of the great deoisions in the history 

of mankind. For the first time anywhere in the civilized world your law abolished the 

institution of human slavery. 

It wasn't until fifty years had passed that the British Empire followed your 
example. Eight decades were to pass before the Civil War sustained the proposition, 
which Massachusetts was the first to advance, that all men are born free and equal. 

But there is another great principle for which the people of America are indebted 
to Massachusetts and its sister New England states - the wise principle of keeping 
government close to the people. 

Your early settlers went to vork to put their new concept of government into 
effect. They established a governmental pattern through which human freedom could 
exnress itself. Here was conceived the device of the Town Meeting. Through it these 
early colonists demonstrated their faith in the ability of people to understand and 
solve their problems together. 

Both of these great Hew England contributions to our national life - the aboli- 
tion of human slavery and the development of government close to the people - are 
based upon fundamentals that are eternally sound. They are just as dependable now for 



NEWS RELEASE 



X-fc. qLj 



Republican National 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



MMITTEE 



FOR RELEASE 



Morning Papers Thurs. Sept. 30, 19^ 
Radio Release 6 P.M., 3.S.T. 






SPEECH OF GOVERNOR 3ARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

KBPTTSLI CAN NOMINEE FOR. VICE FREStDSM' 

(Prepared for delivery at Newark, IT. J. 

at 9:30 P.M. EST, Wed., Sept. 29, 19*8) 



Mr. Chairnan and fellow-Americans: 

We have cone a long way on this tour, and while the distance between 

New Jersey and California, measured in miles, seems far, the warmth of 
the reception we have received from people everywhere demonstrates to me as nothing 
else could that this country is really one great Dig neighborhood. 

In the space of a century and. a half, the barriers of distance have been re- 
duced by the ingenuity of our people. 

This great national neighborhood of 1*10 million people, extending from ocean 
to ocean and Dominion to Gulf, contains an amasing diversity of interests, inter- 
related and interdependent. 

Here, along the Atlantic Seaboard, you have over a long period of time 
developed great industrial centers. Here we see the meaning of the terns "American 
Know How." To me this term brings to mind the training, the experience, the re- 
sourcefulness of workers and management that make it possible to improve old pro- 
cesses, devise new ones, and thereby to constantly raise the living standards of our 

people. 

In the newer areas of the west we need your "know how" and we need, as the 
nation needs, the endless variety of products that flow from it, We in turn can 
contribute to the national economy the riches of our great natural resources as we 
build our industry to serve the increasing population of the West. 

Here in Newark is an outstanding example of how people can combine their 
skill, their industry and their thrift to develop one of the greatest industrial 
centers in this or any other country. 

Here, and in the other great industrial centers of the nation, are the homes 
and the families directly affected by any state or national programs affecting 
human welfare. In the aggregate, those who contribute their services and their 
labor to our great productive enterprises in these centers constitute, along with 
the farmers, the great economic backbone of America. It is mainly in these centers 
that arise the human problems created by our dynamic system of mass production. 



Republican National Committee 

1137 CONNECTICUT 1 



X-E 815 

. 2. 7 £T WASHINGTON 6113. C. "~ H 

^'° ■ J* 8 ww 

FOR RELEASE 

For Morning Papers of 
Wed. .Sept. 29. 1948. 
Radio release 6 P.M. EST 

SPEECH OF GOVERNOR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Hartford, Conn, 
at 8:30 P.M. 3.S.T. Tues. .Sept. 28, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and fellow- Americans: 

As I travel across this wonderful country of ours in this 1948 national camp- 
aign, the one thing that stands out most impressively is this; that in each of our 
3tates we find something distinctive - something that sets each apart from the 
others. Here in the New England region I am constantly reminded how much our great 
West — indeed, all of America — is indebted to the pioneers who founded this 
nation along the Atlantic seaboard. 

The first address I made on my trip was at Salt Lake City. It was mad» on 
the 16th of this month - the eve of the anniversary of the signing of the Constitu- 
tion In Philadelphia 161 years ago. That Constitution, and what it means to America, 
was the theme of ny talk. 

Tonight I am in Connecticut — the Constitution State, — so-called because 148 
years before the Constitution of our country was adopted, Connecticut had already 
lighted the beacon for men seeking liberty under law. In 1639, your earliest 
settlers met and drew up their fundamental orders, a charter which was the first 
written constitution for self-governing people ever drawn in the history of mankind. 
It was the forerunner of our living document - the Constitution of the United States, 
many of the principles of which were taken from the famous charter of Connecticut. 

Here in Hartford is one of the shrines of American patriotism — The Charter 
Oak Place, you call it, where nearly fifty years after your founders had subscribed 
to their Fundamental Orders, they Wd their great document at the Charter Oak to keep 
it from the hands of a Colonial Governor who would have burned it in a public bonfire. 

Your great commonwealth has had a second nickname ever since Revolutionary 
days - the Arsenal of the Nation - because it was here that the colonists came to get 

the weapons with which they won their independence. In the last great war the 

American people again looked to Connecticut — and to the workers in its great 
industrial plants — for the wearoons with which to defend that independence. 

All of us can still come to Connecticut, not so much to rearm ourselves with 
weapons of war, but to replenish our American spirit, reaffirm our faith in human 



NEWS RELEASE 



,X-E 815 



Republican National Committee 



l»»7 CONNECTICUT AVENUI 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



M\o& 




van RELEASE 






Tuesday Morning Papers, 
October 5, 1948 
Radio Release 6:C0 PM 
Monday, Octoter 4, 1948 

ADDRESS OF SENATOR ARTPUR H. VAKDEWIRO, CHAIRMAN 
0? THE SENATE TOKEJCH RELATIONS CCMI'ITTEE, OVER THE FACILITIES 
OF THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1948, 
0:00 to 8:30 P.M., EASTERN STANDARD TIME. 



Daring the last four years, and particularly in the 80th Congress, sincere 
efforts have teen made to take American foreign affairs out of partisan politics . 
To an important degree these efforts have succeeded - with credit to both major 
Parties. I propose tonight to report the Re mblican position in respect to this 
effort in behalf of national unity at the waters' edge. 

The purpose of this unity is to strengthen American security and sustain 
American ideals by giving maximum authority to America's voice for peace with justice. 
In the face of any foreign problems, our unity is as important as our atom bombs. 
It is particularly important as a discouragement to alien miscalculation which, 
otherwise, might 1" ad to the mistaken belief that we are vulnerable because of our . 
domestic divisions. It is our best available insurance for peace . 

Our current anxieties in Paris, Berlin and Moscow are an immediate example. 
Regardless of differences respecting details, the Republican Party opposes surrender 
of our clear rights in Eerlin to Soviet aggression. One such surrender - as at 
Munich - would inevitably precipitate others and multiply the final hazard. We 
condemn transparent Soviet duplicity in rejecting our peace-efforts to lift the 
Berlin blockade and to restore four-power tranquility on a live-and-let-live basis, 
We indict this Soviet record as a threat to everybody's peace, our own emphatically 
included. Ma believe an equitable review of this whole problem in the United 
Nations is the best "calculated risk" for peace. We offer justice and scrupulous 
fair-play. We will take no less In return. This is the substantially united 
American position. 

Governor Dewey has made clear to all the world where we stand on these issues. 

This sort of common action is a vital example of what has come to be known as 
"b i-partisan foreign policy ". It has two vivid advantages at this hour. One I it 
permits our democracy to speak with a great degree of unity at critical moments 
when swift decision is vitalwhon we face totalitarian opponents who can command 
their own instant unity by police decree. Two: it leaves us free to change our 
national administration, if such be the peoples' desire and advantage, without 
affecting the continuity of our foreign policy. 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 






1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



tibi 







FOR RELEASE 



6:00 P.M. , Monday 
October 4, 1948 



Herbert Brovnell, Jr., Campaign 
Manager for the lev/ey-'.farren Ticket, an- 
nounced today that Governor Thomas B. 
lewey vill apeak in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, the night of Monday, October 11. 
The Governor will address a mass meeting 
in Syria Mosque. 



0000OOOO0000 



Republican National Committee 



NEWS RELEASE 



WASHINGTON 6. O. 




■ Z "?£" ' ''^ FOR RELEASE 

Thursday A.M., October 7, 1948 

ADEKSS3 OP STOKER JOSEPH T, MARTPT, JR. AT A 
HSHJBLICALI RALLY IN AJTD3RS0N , I'JDIANA, Oil 
WEDHFSDAY, OCTOBER 6. 1948 



It is a great privilege to come and join in this csnroaign in Indiana which is 
one of the banner Republican States in the Union. I am uarticularly happy to be in 
the Congressional District of my gpod friend, your able and distinguished Congressman, 
Forest Harness. Ke has become an outstanding Representative and with courage and 
intelligence he has fought the good fight in recent years to keep this country upon 
the American track. It is men like Forest Harness to whom the country owes a great 
debt of gratitude that there is still a Government of the ueo-ole, by the people, and 
for the people. 

Through his long service in Congress Forest Krrness has advanced to a place of 
great influence and broad national service. Ho is a member of the Rules Committee of 
the house, rhich guides the entire legislative program* As a rrnking member of the 
Co-xnittee on Expenditures in the Executive Oeprtmenta, he haa direct access to the 
"hole problem of Federal spending. £is special subcommittee in the 80th Congress 
itemized for the American taxpayers the total of almost $100 million year -hich the 
Federal agencies are spending on Government proprgandc — mostly on propaganda to 
socialize the United States. His five reports on the difforent aspects of Federal 
thought control ssito in historic contribution to the defense of our system of Consti- 
tutional government, riis investigation exposed -Taste, extravagance £:nd corruption 
in at least six Federal Departments. In every case these distortions of honest 
American Government -ere brought to the attention of the Department of Justice ond 
the press. The net effect of this intelligent -;or,z -as to slov; do-m the drive for 
collectivist policies rnd program in ."shington. 

We need forest Earness in Washington in the 81st Congress ~ and I am sure that 
the good people of the Fifth Indiana Congressional District realize his great worth 
as a faithful and diligent public servant. I know you will reelect him by an increas- 
ed majority as evidence you are back of him in his fight to maintain representative 
Government, 

This is an unusual type of campaign; ordinarily an administration which has 
been in power has a record of achievement to present to the American people. That 
this campaign is not built upon such a record makes it obvious there is no record 
which would appeal to the people. Therefore, the only alternative is to berate and 
abuse the opposition and we are getting plenty of that, 



II t If U KlLlAOL WASHINGTON 6. D. 



Republican National Committee 

l»»7 CONNCCTICUT AVElfBBS^""" 11 



>IO 



1 i\\\ 

Z. T$ EOR RELEASE 

Horning Papers, Thurs. Oct. 7, 1948 
A national organization of Remiblican Veterans for Dewey and barren was in 
full swing today under the leadership of Harry ¥. Colmery of Topeka, Kansas, it was 
announced by Herbert Browne 11, Jr., rational Campaign Manager. 

An outstanding personality among the five million organized veterans of the 
United States, Chairman Colmery is nationally known as a lawyer, a former National 
Commander of The American legion, and a member of the Loyalty Review Board, charged 
with the responsibility of screening persons accused or suspected of disloyalty in 
the Federal service. 

As Assistant to Republican Campaign Manager Herbert Brownell, Jr. and in 
his additional capacity as Campaign Director of Veterans' Activities, Chairmen 
Colmery announced the makeup of his headquarters staff and said that a comprehensive 
field organization has been organized to cover the entire country. 

Associated with him either at National Headquarters here or in the field are 
Past National Commanders of the United Spanish War Veterans, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Disabled American Veterans, American legion and AMVSTS. It was announced that 
scores of other nationally known veterans and public figures will be active in the 
SOP veterans' campaign also. 

In addition to the headquarters staff, the veterans' organization includes 
a campaign director for the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast area, nine field 
representatives of the National Chairman, a national Coordinating Committee, 13 
area chairmen, veterans' chairmen for each state, and an Advisory Committee made up 
of 134 prominent veterans of World Wars I and 11 from all parts of the country. 

A Congressional Committee of Republican war veterans in Congress, represent- 
ing 27 percent of the membership of the House and 28 percent of the Senate, will 
work with the veterans' organization to bring out the vote and enlist younger 
veterans in the Republican vause. 

Cam-naign aides were announced by Chairman Colmery as follows: 

VIce-Chairmen: John Lewis Smith, former Conmander-in-Chief United 
Spanish War Veterans and distinguished member of 
the District of Columbia bar. 

Janes E. Van Zandt of Altoona, Pa., combat veteran 
of World Wars I and II, former Commander-in-Chief 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and member of Congress 
from Pennsylvania, 

W. Froome Barbour, prominent Cincinnati lawyer and 
former Commander-in-Chief Disabled American Veterans. 



Republican National CoMAurri-.ty 

Nr III ( n r I r 1 c r "" Connecticut avinu« ., 

tlfO KtLCAOt WASHINGTON «. D C. ' " 



tll^ 



X-E 815 

FOR RKLKASK 

Afternoon Papers, 
Friday, Oct. 8, 1948 

It'9 B combined orerations" from here on at Republican Veterans Headquarters. 

Army, Navy and Air Corps are all represented in' a triumvirate which will give 
its entire tins to the Dewey-Warren Campaign from now until the Hovemter election, 
as announced by Herbert Brownell.Jr., Dewey-Warren Campaign Manager. 

All three are former N.-tinnal Commanders of Veterans' organizations. One is 
a veteran of World 'far I. Two are veterans of World War II. 

One is a Hew Englander who 'rent to Colorado to visit and stayed long enough 
to accumulate two law degrees from the University of Colorado, 

All three are lawyers, as it hap^ns, nnd all have "joined up" for the dura- 
tion of the Hstional Campaign to organize He-cublican Veterans for Dewey and Warren. 

Harry W. Colmery, National Chairman of Republican Veterans for Dewey and 
Warren, is a member of the Loyalty Review Board which scrutinizes the loyalties of 
Tederal employes. He has found time in a busy lifetime of law practice to serve also 
as National Commander of the American Legion and in various cublic or quasi-publlo 
capacities in Washington and elsewhere. He served in the Army in World War I when 
the present Air Force was a fledgling in the Army Signal Corps. 

Ray Sawyer of Plymouth, N.H., one of five vice-chairmen of the Re-oubliean 
Veterans' Organization, is the New Englandei— turned-We sterner, who subsequently 
returned East and entered the Federal Civil Service in Washington. During World War 
II he served with the First Troop Carrier Command and 20th Air Force, which filled 
the skies over Japan with B-29's and droprjed the atom bomb on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. 
One of the organizers and a former national commander of the AMVETS, he resigned a 
position with the Federal Government *° S e t into the Re-publican Campaign. 

Edgar C. Corry.Jr., who was National Commander of the AM1FTS during the year 

ending October 1, is a former naval officer whose long experience with courts 

martial during World War II led him to tell Secretary of Defense James Forrestal the' 

"The whole system ought to be reformed." He obtained his law degree from the 

University of Iowa, and will serve during the campaign at a field representative of 

Chairman Colmery in that State, 

Sawyer and Corry have both labored with Congress and the National Defense 

establishment to modernize military justice and obtain greater consideration for en- 
listed men. They have had the satisfaction of seeing some of their recom-endations 
adopted through Congressional or administrative action. But though serving their 
country in two wars and different services, all thr«e agree that the Veterans of the 
country are clear-thinking Americans, de'voted to American institutions and determin- 
ed to preserve them. 



Republican National, Committee 



u r ui v p r I [ICC "" Connecticut avenue 



WASHINGTON 8. D. C. 



4/13 



x-e tus Jp^ u 

Foif i release 

Morning Papers, Saturday, 0c*3'b«rJ348l Q 48 
Radio Release 6:00 P.M., ii.S.T." 

SPEECH OP GOVERNOR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Philadelphia 
at 9:00 P.M., Friday, Oct. 1, 1948) 

Mr. Chairmen and my Fellow-Americans; 

I am glad to be in Philadelphia - again. In your city three months ago I re- 
ceived one of the greatest honors that can come to an American from his political 
party. But, it is an honor that brings with it a sense of great responsibility. 
I am thankful, therefore, that I cen face this responsibility as part of a united 
Republican party. Its preconvention rivalries have been forgotten. Its ranks have 
been reformed under the standard of a great American selected in the iunerican way 
to lead us. 

He will lead us not merely to victory as a party, but to service for the nation 
a great Republican, a great Governor of your neighbor state, and the next President 
of the United States - Tom Dewey. 

I have come through eighteen states of the Union since I left Sacramento tiro 
weeks ago. I have had a great opportunity to meet people in many towns and cities 
and to discuss with them the problems facing our nation today. 

And believe me, there are great problems facing us. I have found that the 
American people are quite conscious of them. There is apprehension in every home 
over the cold was in which we are engaged. Hen and women everywhere are wondering 
whether we are going to be able to resolve our differences with Russia and her sat- 
ellites in a Just and lasting peace. There is concern in every home over what every 
housewife understands - the high cost of living caused by rising prices oh the one 
hand and heavy taxes on the other. 

There is little need to tell the American People that we are in a difficult 
situation - both at home and abroad. They know it. They know we are facing a 
challenge greater than has ever been faced by any country in the history of the world. 

The main concern in the minds of the people of America does not arise out of 
a failure to understand our problems. It does not arise out of any doubt in America. 
It arises out of their realization that we are still trying to face those problems 
under a national administration that long ago began to split up and that is nov 
shattered beyond any hope of repair. 

They are weary of stories of internal disagreement and dissension within an 
administration to which they should be able to look for calm, consistent leadership. 
They have grown tired of hearing daily more complaining and witnessing daily less 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National, Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 0. D. 

ir 



-E 815 




FOR RELEASE 48 



>: 



Afternoon Newspapers 
Thursday, October 7, 1948 



Herbert Brownell, Jr., Republican National Campaign Manager, announced 
that Ray Sawyer of Plymouth, IT. H., former National Commander of the AMVETS and 
until recently a lawyer in the career civil service of the Federal Government, 
joined the staff of Republican Veterans for Dewey and Warren at National Head- 
quarters today as a protest against what he characterized as the dangerous ten- 
dencies of government under the Truman Administration. 

Chairman Harry W. Colaery, GOP Campaign Director of Veterans' Activities, 
announced that Sawyer would serve as one of tfive vice-chairmen of the National 
Veterans' Organization and also as Director of special activities at Republican 
Headquarters. 

A former Air Corps officer who returned to civilian employment with the 
government after VJ-Day, the recent head of the AMV3TS said that he quit the 
Federal service to get into the campaign because of a conviction that a complete 
change in government leadership is necessary to save the country from disaster. 

Mr. Sawyer said: 

"We need abler leadership in the White House and more character and com- 
petence in the men around the President. 

"I have also been shocked to find in my own experience that more than one 
Federal agency is slowly but certainly getting into the hands of men who seem to 
be Bore interested in undermining our governmental system than in preserving the 
principles on which the countcy was founded, and under which we have attained 
world leadership and become the envy of other peoples everywhere. 

"The Veterans of World War II are first of all good Americans. Our country 
and our way of life may not be perfect, but they are at least the best in the 
world, and the men who served in uniform know it and fought to preserve them. 
They have a chance now to strengthen the barrier against alien ideologies by el- 
ecting Dewey and Warren. I believe they will do so." 

A graduate of the University of New Hamoshire in 1931, with two law degrees 
obtained later from the University of Colorado, Mr. Sawyer was formerly executive 
assistant to the Surgeon General of the U. 5. Public Health Service and later an 
attorney with the Federal Communications Commission. Entering the Army in 1942, 
he* was graduated from officers training school and subsequently served with the 
First Troop Carrier Command and 20th Air Force. He was at one time secretary to 
the late Ambassador Winant while the latter was Governor of New Hampshire, 

Membership in the AMVSTS doubled during the year of his incumbency as 
national commander. 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



1337 CONNECTICUT JkVENUI 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E 815 
• lis 



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RKLEASK 



•48 



Morning Newspapers 
Sunday, Oct. 10, 1948 

Completion of a Field Organization of Republican Veterans blanketing the 
United States was announced today by Herbert Brownell, Jr., Dewey-Warren Ca- 
paign Manager. 

Harry f. Colmery, National Chairman of the Republican Veterans for Dewey 
and Warren will direct the Republican Veterans Campaign from Washington, 
with a special Campaign Director to assist him in the Rocky Mountain and 
Pacific Coast States, and nine field representatives who will work in critical 
areas as required. 

Warren H. Atherton of Stockton, California, a former national colander 
of The American Legion, was appointed campaign director for the western states. 

For closer concentration on local problems, the country was divided into 
13 areas, with a chairman for each area— some of them including several states 
and others only one or two. Each state will also have its own chairman of 
Republican veterans" activities under the Dewey and Warren banner. 

Through this organization, Chairman Colmery explained, it is hoped to 
develop local leadership among veterans in every community and at the same time 
supply the supervision, coordination and assistance required for effective 
teamwork. A coordinating committee headed by Mr. Atherton as chairman, and in- 
cluding outstanding leaders of veterans' organizations of World War I and II, 
will serve as a link between state and area committees and national headquarters. 

Field representatives of the national chairman include former National 
Commander Paul H. Griffith of The American Legion and former National Commander 
Edgar C. Corry, Jr., of the AM7ETS. 

Lieut. Gov. Daniel B. Strickler and Congressman Jamee E. VanZandt of 

Pennsylvania, the latter a former commander-in-chief of the Veterans of Foreign 

*ars. are on the Coordinating Committee. Mr. Corry is also on this committee. 

The complete field organization follows: 

Field representatives of National Chairman: 

Paul H Griffith Guy May Joe P os. 

Grady Lewis John C. Vivian Edgar C Corrv Jr 

Thomas Watters, Jr. Donald Little Chfrles McGonegal ' 



Coordinating Committee: 



Warren H. Atherton. California, Chairman 

Niel Allen, Oregon 

Frank N. Belgrano, Oregon 



KEPUBLICAM NATION AL U )M,MITTKE 

NEWS RELEASE '^ w'Z!m > M «. VS. )•* 4j||l 

rn^xo i Cop* J 4o 



X-h bia FOR RELEASE 



/ , 



IS 



Thursday A.M. papers, Oct. 7, 1948 .'. 
Radio Release 6:00 P.M., E.S.T. 



SPEECE OF GOVERNOR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Chicago, 111. 
9:30 P.M., C.S.T., Wed., Oct, 6, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and my fellow Americans: 

I cannot tell you how happy I am to be with you tonight in this great 
Chicago gathering. It is a heartwarming experience to see how the descendants of 
26 nations can gather in one of America' 3 greatest cities to display, as Americans, 
the culture of the lands of their forebears, under the protective folds of the Stars 
and Stripes. 

It must be a great sight and a thrilling experience for any American, but 
to me it has added significance. I feel that I am part and parcel of this group 
because, like many of you, my forebears came to this country within the lifetimes of 
people still living. The parents of my own fither and mother brought them to this 
country as babes in arms. Both families settled here in Illinois, my mother's family 
here in Chicago, from where they were evacuated in the great fire of 1871. Uy 
father's family moved to your neighboring state of Iowa. My parents were married in 
Minneapolis, and if the lure of the great West had not taken hold of my father Just 
when it did, I too would have been born in the Middle West instead of my own 
California. 

The accident of birthplace often has a profound effect upon the life of 
people. And, a meeting of this kind makes that clear. If it had not been for the 
fact that our parents or their ancestors came here, fleeing from racial, religious, 
or political oppression, or in search of a more abundant life under our free insti- 
tutions, most of us would have been born in countries that have either passed behind 
the iron curtain or are in momentary danger of such a fate. Those people over there 
must have the same fundamental instincts we have. In their heart of hearts, they 
must all love freedom as we do. They must long for the day when their frontiers, 
like our Canadian and Mexican borders, will no longer need fortifications and become 
mere geographical lines which only a surveyor can locate. Surely they would welcome 
the good neighbor policy as we have it in this hemisphere. Surely they too pray for 
collective security, not through an armed truce but through the cooperation of all 
nations of the world. 

And this meeting tonight i3 the best evidence I could imagine of the fact 
that the United Nations can work if there is a determination to make it work. If 



NHhfr RELEASE 



Republican National Committee 



1SJ7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 






48 



/- -1€ 



IX >H R EI. EASE 



Morning papers of Monday f/j) / 
October 11, 1948 



Herbert Brwonell, Jr., Republican Campaign Manager, announced today that 
"Fighting Joe" Foss, who in one month of air combat over Guadalcanal tlod Eddie 
Rickenbacker's '"orld "far I record by shooting down 23 enemy planes, has enlisted 
in the Dewey and ''.'arren forces for the current campaign. 

In a message received by National Chairman Harry ff. Colmery of Republican 
Veterans for Dewey and "Jarren, Colonel Fops accepted appointment as field repre- 
sentative of the Republican veterans' organization for South Dakota. His home is 
in Sioux Falls, where he already has three responsibilities as a business man, 
candidate for the South Dakota Legislature, and commanding officer of the 175th 
Fighter Squadron, South Dakota National Guard. 

It was while serving with the Marine Corps that Colonel Foss won recognition 
as one of the outstanding fighter pilots of all time, running a close race with 
friendly rivals in other services to see who could shoot down the most enemy planes 
in 7orld far II. Although his record was topped slightly by others, he piled up a 
total of 26 enemy planes before contracting malaria and being ordered home for 
recuperation. 

Of his victims, 20 were Zero fighters, four were bombers, and two were patrol 
planes. 

In November 1942 he himself was shot down on the island of Malaita, in the 
Solomons group, after having first shot three Japanese planes out of the sky. A 
Navy patrol boat picked htm out of the water. 

For his exploits in combat he received the Congressional Medal of Honor and 
about all the other decorations awarded during 7orld "far II to air combat personnel. 

Returning after the war to Sioux Falls, the former farm boy and South Dakota 
National Guardsman resigned his Marine Corps Reserve commission to become commanding 
officer of the local Ur National Guard unit, thu3 enabling him to keep up his 
flying training in advanced types of planes. In the Marine Corps he rose from 
flying cadet to the grade of Major. He is now a Colonel in the Air Naional Guard. 

In addition to nominations him for the Legislature, his neighbors sent him to 
Philadelphia as an alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention. 

Although running for office himself and getting established in business, he will 
take time to tour the state in behalf of the Republican cause for the GOP veterans' 



NEWS RELEASE 



Republican National |coMAii|trEE 



1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



X-E 81f 



VOn RKI.KASE 



Afternoon newspapers of Tuesday 
October 12, 1948 

An Advisory Committee of 130 veterans of "forld "Jars I and II, including numerous 
former National Commanders of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign '7ars, Spanish 
Tar Veterans, Disabled American Veterans and other outstanding representatives of the 
5,000,000 organized veterans of the United States, will serve the Dewey-^arren cause 
in the current national campaign under the leadership of Chairman Harry V. Colmery, 
Director of Veterans Activities, 

Announcement to this effect was made today by Herbert Brownell, Jr., Dewey-'Tarren 
Campaign Manager. 

Among those serving on the Committee are former Governor Harold 3. Stassen of 
Minnesota, Lt, Governor Daniel G. Strickler of Pennsylvania, and former Governor 
John C. Vivian of Colorado. 

Other names prominent in national affairs include those of:Kajor General ".'illiam 
J. Donovan, Archibald Roosevelt, former Assistant Secretary of ",'ar F. Trubee Davison 
and Eddie Rickenbacker. : 

Past National Commanders of the Legion include: 
Frank N. Belgrano, California 
Stephen F. Chadwick, Washington 
Franklin D'Olier, New Jersey 
Edward R. Hayes, Illinois 
Raymond J. Kelly, Michigan 
Hanford MacNider, Iowa 
Lynn TJ. Stambaugh, North Dakota 
Hilo J. "'arner, Ohio 
Paul H. Griffith, Pennsylvania 
Alvin Owsley, Texas 
John R. Quinn, California 
Three former National Commanders of the AMVETS, Jack «f. Hardy of California, 
Ray Sawyer of New Hampshire, and Edgar C. Corry, Jr., of Iowa are in the group. 

Past National Commanders-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign 7ars include Ray 
Brannaman of Colorado, Louis E. Starr of Oregon, Joe Stack, Congressman James E. Van 
Sandt and Robert G. ".'oodside of Pennsylvania; and Bernard 71. Kearney of New York, 
among others. 



Republican National Committke 



_4U W S RELEASE ZSSSTJT" £ 



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Morning Papers Tues. Oct. 5, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 P.M.! E.S.T. 

SPEECH OF GOVrr-UOR EARL '.'ARRSN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Foninee for lr ice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Pittsburgh, Pa. 
9:00 P.M., 3.S.T., Monday, Oct. 4, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and Fellow-Americans : 

I am happy to be in this great productive city of Pittsburgh. Merely to 
come into your city gives one a striking reminder of the strength of our caique 
industrial system. This city demonstrates, perhaps more than any other city in 
America, the interdependence of each part of our country upon the other. 

In Pittsburgh one cannot help thinking that the measure of a city's greatness 
is, not merely its own community life or its own chief occupation, but its contri- 
bution to the livelihood and welfare of one hundred and forty million people. 

Each community produces something without which people in sections far 
removed could not possibly live according to the American standard. Every city, 
every farming community, makes or grows something needed for the nation's tables, 
for the building of its homes, for the transportation of its people, for the 
thousand and one purposes that make life in the United States different — and better 
than any other place in the world. 

Some com-iunities snread their products county wide, some state wide, some, 
as in the case of the basi° steel of Pittsburgh, nation and world wide. 

All this adds up to the idea of America as a going concern — the specialized 
production of many places keeping the whole nation fed, housed, clothed, decently 
comfortable. No one American community lives unto itself. It could not exist 
merely on its own foraging and on its own fat. 

On the kind of a trip I've just been making - through twenty states and 
nearly a hundred cities and towns - one is struck with the fact that this country 
of ours is really one great neighborhood. We've got one hundred and forty million 
people, each doing a little piece of an inconceivably great job, and each depending 
for his own and his family's welfare upon others doing the same thing. 

To the extent that one man regards his job as unimportant, to the extent that 
one community lags behind with its contribution. to the extent that one state slows 
down - to that extent is America's production decreased and the welfare of its people 
everywhere endangered. 

On this trip I have been catching the full truth and import of an observation 



Rei»uiu.ican National Committke 

Nf III Q I! r I r ■ n p ,S " CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

L IT o If t L t A t Washington e. d. 



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ft [ 710 
Morning papers, Wed. Oct. 6, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 P.M., E.S.T. 

SFECH OF GOVERNOR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 
(prepared for delivery at Charleston, W.Va. 
9:30 P.M., E.S.T. , Tues. Oct. 5, 1348) 

Mr. Chairman and fellow-Americans: 

I am happy to be in West Virginia and in your capital city of Charleston. 
This is the 23rd state I've visited since leaving California just three weeks ago 
tomorrow. I had been in many of ther.e states before, but on this trip I have had the 
thrill of talking with people in nearly one hundred cities and towns. These people 
have been kind enough to come down to the stations as we stopped along the line to 
give me a hearing in the great American way. 

They are people from all walks of life. They represent both political 
parties. There have been nen, women and children. I only wish that each of you 
here tonight could have the opportunity that has come to me. You would come to tl-0 
conclusion that after all this great country, with its 3,000,000 square miles, 48 
states and its thousands of cities and towns , is really one great neighborhood. 

In all sections of the country the American people are fundamentally the same 
no matter how their communities may differ in location, terrain and principal occupa- 
tion. The people of all these communities are intensely proud of their American 
citizenship. They are proud of what this country of ours has been able to accom- 
plish in the past. They are confident that it can accomplish a great deal more in 
the future for better living, for greater opportunities for more and more people. 

I am particularly happy to come into your mountainous State of West Virginia 
because I have never been here before. 

I have just begun to realize what a tremendous amount of production baa been 
going on. and is going on, in your state. But the thing that impresses me is, not 
so much the amount of your production, as its importance to the people of all the 
other states of the union. As I stood this morning speaking to the people of Clarks- 
burg, who braved an early morning rain to show their kindness, I was thinking about 
■ your hardwood industry - the windowpanes that are made here and sent out to my own 
State of California and to many other states where housing materials have been so 

badly needed. 

Here in this Kanawha Valley and in other parts of your State are your soft 
coal mines. This coal is the fuel that makes possible many other kinds of produc- 



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FOR RELEASE 

For morning papers of 

Sunday, October ti, 1946 -»4 I O I 

Radio Release 6 P,U, EST V I * I 



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SPEECH OF GOVERNCR EARL WARREN OF CALIFORNIA 

Republican Nominee for Vice-President 
(Prepared for delivery at Baltimore, Md, 
9:00 p.m. EST, Saturday, Oct. 2, 1942) 



Mr. Chairman and fellow -Americans » 

I am happy to be in your fine city of Baltimore. 

Eighteen days ago I left my home state of California to do my share in 
this 1948 national campaign. We've traveled more than 5,000 miles in that time. 
We've traveled through 20 str.tes and have visited 75 cities. 

Every where people have been kind enough to spare a few minutes from 
their busy days to come down to the tr&in to give me a hearing. They come from 
all 'walks of life. They represent both political parties. There are men, wo- 
mon and children. One of the greatest thrills I have had on this trip is this 
living proof of one of the fine, characteristic traits of America today ~ the 
willingness of people to give every other American an opportunity to be heard* 
As long as this is true, we should never doubt the ability of our country to 
solve its problems, whatever they may be. 

On this trip I have also been impressed by what I might call the variety 
within unity of the American people. 

What I mean is this J Every city and town has some characteristic of its 
own and makes a different contribution to the life of the nation. 

In one place we find factories and smokestacks where men in their work- 
clothes are producing some basic material, some special article, not just for 
thoir own community, but for tho nation. In another place, farmers, tanned and 
rugged, drive to the depot to listen for a while, taking time they oan little 
spare from tho job of raising so.Te foodstuff suited to their toll, not jus*, fox 
their own community, but for distribution to tho hos03 of tho nation. 

People in the cities take a few minutes off from the thousand-acd-one 
special or professional services that holi thi3 great economy of ours together 
sxi\ sake it run smoothly. 

This, indeed, is America as a going concern. 

If only every American would think this over, think beyond his own 
particular job, even beyond his own neighborhood or conmunity, an( * try *o 
picture this United States of ours as a nation of individuals, each making 



II r Uf ft K r I [ I P [ 13S7 Connecticut avenue 



Republican National Committee 

337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

WASHINGTON 6. D. C. .Ji-. 




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t Wednesday Afternoon Papers 

October 13, 1948 

' Republican national Campaign Chairman Herbert Brownell Jr., was Informed 
today by Harry V. Colmery, Director of Tetertne' Activities at Republican rational 
Headquarter, that 37 Republioan members of the United States Senate and 119 Repub- 
lican members of the House, all veterans of World Wars I and II, will serve on 
a Congressional Committee of Republican War Veterans in the current campaign. 

They will work with the veterans! organization set up in the States to 
enlist the Interest of World War II veterans particularly, and bring Out the oa*. 
imum vote for the Republican ticket. 

Republican veterans in the Senate represent 25jt of its total strength and 
53# of the Republican membership. The list includes Senators* 

Zales K. Acton William B. Jenner 

Raymond 2. Baldwin James P. Kern 

Owen Brewster William T. Knowland 

John W. Brioker Henry Oabot Lodge Jr. 

0, Wayland Brooks Joseph R. McCarthy 

0, Douglas Buck George W. Malone 

Harry P. Cain Edward Martin 

Homer S. Capehart Eugene D. Milliken 

John Sherman Cooper Chapman Revercomb 

Guy Cordon Leverett Saltonstall 

Henry . Dworshak Edward J. Thye 

Chan Gurney Kenneth S. Wherry 

Bourke B. Hlckenlooper John J, Williams 
Irving M, Ives 

World War II veterans in the Senate include Senators Cain of Washington, 
Jenner of Indiana, Cooper of Kentucky, Knowland of California, Lodge of Massachu- 
setts, McCarthy of Wisconsin, Malone of Strait . i and Martin of Pennsylvania. 
Senator Martin, a veteran also of World War I, commanded the 38th Division (Penn- 
sylvania national Guard) in the early months of World War II, prior to his election 
to the Senate in 1946. 

Veterans in the House represent Z7% of the total membership of the House 
and almost half of the Republican membership. Among the Republioan veterans in the 
House leadership are Charles A. Halleek of Indiana, Earl 0. Michener and Jesse P. 
Woleott of Michigan, Clifford M. Hope of Kansas, Bsn t, Jensen of Iowa, Lawrence 
H. Smith of Wisconsin, Lsslle C. Arsnds, Leo Allen, and, Everett M. Dlrksen of Ill- 
inois. 



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Republican National Committee 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVB MM— ^ -i -i 

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FOR RELEASE 



*II23 



Immediate 
September 22, 1948 

Herbert Brownell, Jr., Republican Campaign Director, today announced the 

appointment of Robert R. Snodgrass, of Atlanta, Chairman of the Dewey-Warren Campaign 

Committee for the state of Georgia. 

Mr. Snodgrass was unanimously endorsed for the appointment by the Republican 
State Central Committee of Georgia during a meeting in Atlanta on Sept. 11. 

The Dewey-Warren drive to carry Georgia into the Republican column for the 
first time in the State's history is well under way throughout the state with Dewey- 
Warren centers already established in Atlanta, Columbus, Savannah and other key 
cities. 

Mr. Snodgrass said: 

"We have the ticket in Governor Dewey and Governor Warren and sentiment is 
rapidly crystalizing in their favor among Georgia Democrats and Independents who are 
dissatisfied with the present administration of 'complaining failure'. 

"From every section of the State we get renorts of more and more people 
rallying to Dewey and Warren as the answer to who has the wisdom, courage and 
fortitude to meet the growing world crisis." 

In making the appointment of the Atlanta businessman and former classmate of 
Governor Dewey at the University of Michigan, Mr. Brownell said: 

"Mr. Snodgrass has the solid support of a militant Dewey- Warren organization 
in Georgia, the core of which is the regular Republican organization in that State. 
The efforts of this group have already placed Georgia in the 'possible' classifica- 
tion for a Dewey-Warren victory. " 

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CU/C DCirRCF ,337 CONNECTICUT avenue 



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Republican National Committee 

tf/W 



WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



FOR reksxkkt h 

Tuesday A.M. Sent, 21. 1948 4 8 

SE5ECH OS 60VEPE0R EARL TTIBIIWT fUlHTTOJUIl 

Republican Nominee for Vice President 

(Prepared for delivery at Tulsa, Okla. 
at 8:00 p.m. CST Monday, Sept. 20, 1948) 

Mr. Chairman and My Fellow Americans: 

I want to tell you how good it is to tie with you tonight in the thriving 
city of Tulsa, and in the great state of Oklahoma, This is my first visit to Tulsa. 
But Oklahomans are not unknown to me. As a natter of fact, I have met more 
Oklahomans in my own state than there are here in Tulsa. Among the five million 
people who have come to California in the last fifteen years, hundreds of thousands 
are Oklahomans. They are making a real contribution, in agriculture and industry, 
to our fast growing state. 

And tonight, I bring you the greetings of a favorite daughter of Oklahoma— 
and a favorite son-in-law, Frances and Thomas B« Dewey* 

Today, as our train rolled across your western nlains, I thought of another 
Oklahoman - one who moved to my state - an humble man, '-hose quiet humor and kindly 
philosophy brought something wonderful into the lives of the American ueople. Will 
Rogers was one of your own sons. His beautiful character; his fine, clear mind, 
his warm humor have bestowed an eternal glory u-oon the State that produced him. 

Will Rogers brightened the days of all of us. He saw through sham and pre- 
tense into the heart of things. He loved the truth. He loved sincerity. He always 
made his point. But he always did it in a wonderful way — with a chuckle — never 
bitter, never destructive. His uhilosoxihy and tolerance set a pattern that might 
well be -practiced in all walks of life — by all people ~ from the farmhouse to the 
White House. 

As I travel across the country in this campaign, I would like to see it kept 
in the spirit of Will Rogers - an occasion for meeting our issues honestly, dis- 
cussing them fairly and without rancor or malice — criticizing, on occasion, but 
always with a constructive purpose in mind. 

When I entered this convention hall tonight, I did not come in the spirit of 
the Democratic candidate who opened his campaign two days ago by publicly proclaim- 
ing ~ "I am going out to give them hell." 

And I'll wager that if you listen to my friend and colleague, Thomas E. Dewey, 
on the radio about fifty minutes from now ~ at nine o'clock tonight, opening his 



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Republican NATioNAil?t4jNiMiTTEE 

UtlllC DCI Mfr "" c ° nnectic «t aveLe , 

I! C H If L L L II t WASHINGTON 6. D. C> '' 

FOR RELEASE 

Morning Papers, 
Eriday, 3ept e 24, .1948 
Radio Beiease, 6:00 P.M. 
SOT 
Thursday, Sept. 23,1948 

TEXT OF THS ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS E. DEWEY, REPUBLICAN 
NOMINEE FOB PRESIDENT, DELIVERED AT MONTGOMERY STADIUM, PHOENIX, 
ARIZONA, THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 23, 1948 , AND BROADCAST OVER 
THE FACILITIES OF RADIO STATIONS KTAR AND X00L FROM 8:30 to 9:00 ■ 
PM, M5T. 

These are stirring times to be an American. And I don't know any more stirring 
place for an American to he than here in your great Southwest. This is still pioneer- 
ing country. Here, notody has to argue with anybody else about looking to the 
future. You're looking that way already. You know that your future is still ahead 
of you. 

And that's exactly what I believe about every part of our country. That's what 
I've been saying to our people. Curs is a magnificent land - every mrt of it.- Pn't 
let anybody frighten you or try to stanroede you into believing that America is 
finished. America's future - like yours in Arizona - is still ahead of us. 

Many stirring things are haTjwning here in the Southwest. Tonight I want to 
talk to you particularly about one of them. Across the border in your neighbor State, 
on the night of July 16, 1945, American scientists exploded the first atomic bomb. 
Today, the Government has built there a great factory and research center to carry 
forward and improve our knov; ledge and production. 

That July day, three years ago, was a momentous date in human history. What 
happened there wasnothing less than this: Man took the lid off a whole new layer 
of the Universe. With immense labor, immense courage and resourcefulness and with 
the creative genius known only to free peoples, our scientists laid their hands 
on the ultimate physical force and began to harness it for our use. That fact has 
already changed the world in which we live. It will unbelievably change the world 
in which our children live. 

That much we know. But one thing, the one all important thing, we do not know. 
We do not know how the world will be changed, whether for evil or for good. There 
is no middle ground. The Atomic Age will be one of unimagined blessing or of 
unimagined disaster. We do not know which it will be. That is for us - for mankind - 
to determine. It may be our final choice. That choice is our challenge. Mankind has 
never faced another of such importance. As we face that challenge and take stock 
of our opuortunity, we will know that the backward look won't do. The backward road 
won't do. We are living in a new Age. This Age requires of us new wisdom, new 
courage and a new vision, I propose that we summon such wisdom, courage and vision 
and, with faith, not fear, go forward together. 



Republican National Committee 



HEWS RELEA: 



WASHiNGTON 6. D. C. 



35 



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FOR RELEASE 






Monday Afternoon, Oct. 11, 1948 

Five million organized veterans in the United States were reminded today that 
the fate of the housing, cost-of-living and national defense programs in the next 
Congress depends directly on the election cf legislators who will support Governor 
Dewey's policies when he becomes Fresident. 

In a telegram made public hy Republican National Campaign Chairman Herbert 
Brownell, Jr., the veterans' field organization was urged by National Chairman Harry 
¥. Colmery of Republican Veterans for Dewey and '..'arren that "combined operations are 
as necessary to win the -peace as to win the war." They were urged to concentrate 
^^ particularly on the election of Republican senators wherever there is a contest. 

The text of Mr. Colmery 's telegram follows: 

"It is imperative in the national interest to concentrate wherever necessary on 
the election of Republican candidates for the United States Senate. 

"As Fresident, Governor Dewey must be able to count on a Senate which will con- 
firm his appointments and support his policies. The issue transcends personalities. 
We can neither solve our pressing domestic problems nor present a united front to the 
world until vie end confusion and conflict in Washington. 

"Flease remind cur younger veterans particularly that the fate of the housing, 
cost-of-living and national defense programs depend on teamwork in the National 
government during the next four years. The lack of it now not only delays domestic 
solutions, but encourages Russian aggressions against what they regard as a divided 
neople. 

"World War II veterans who saw the Army, Navy and Air Force operate as a team 
in wartime will understand that combined operations are as necessary to win the 
■oeace as to win the war. 



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■- Republican National Committee 

NEWS RELEASE Washington 6. d. c.|| 

X.E"815 ^'° * : .« 

Thursday, Sept. 23, 1948 
Radio Release 6:00 PM.EDT 
Wednesday, Sept. 32, 1948 

TEXT OF ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS E. DEWEY, REPUBLICAN $XXl 
NOMINEE FOR PRESIDENT, DELIVERED AT THE UNIVERSITY OP HEW 
MEXICO GYMNASIUM, ALBUQUERQUE, N.M., WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 
22 FROM 8:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. MST OVER NEW MEXICO STATE NET WORK. 

Two fundamental problems confront the American people today. One is to 
establish a just and lasting peace and prevent a threatened world war. The other 
is- to establish at home stable and constantly improving economic conditions and 
avoid a disastrous inflation followed by collapse. Some people forget about the 
world and worry only about our own problems. But we can't do either one. These 
urgent issues cannot be separated. They are tied up together. It is perfectly clear 
that we cannot get economic stability at home and go forward to a. better life for 
every one of us so long as we live in a world racked by the fear of war. It is 
equally clear that we cannot hope to mate an effective contribution to world peace 
if our economic strength is wasted away by inflation. 

Nov; let's squarely face up to the facts about inflation. We can lick this 
problem. The American people can lick any problem if they understand it and tackle 
it together. 

Inflation is a Ten Dollar word for what every one of us is up against, the 
high cost of living. That includes the high cost of groceries, the high cost of 
building a new home, the high cost of doing business, the high cost of running the 
government, and everything else. Farm prices are good, but the farmer sells at 
wholesale and buys at retail and he buys at prices that have almost doubled. Mean- 
while the farmer, the rarcher, and the stockgrower, live under a fear of a collapse 
of prices. The small business nan knows that a slight droo of business will nut him 
in' the red and workers everywhere fear a recession will man loss of jobs. That boom 
and bust is what we are determined to prevent. 

Now what should your National Administration do about this problem of inflation? 
Well, the first thing is to get men in Washington who will know what caused it. 
The immediate causes of the present high prices are rooted in the heavy government 
spending of the war. That, of course, was unavoidable, and we do not begrudge a 
cent of it. Our present inflation danger is greatly aggravated by the mistaken 
policies, bad management "and poor judgment of the Federal Government which for years 
has been moving heaven and earth trying to bring on just such an inflation as we are 
now suffering from. 

The causes also include the huge outpouring by the Federal Government of 



Republican National Committee 



NEWS RELEASE 



13S7 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON 6. D. C. 



X-E 815 



tfixa 



FOR RELEASE 






A,M» Papers 
Hadio Release 

SPITS CH 05" G0T3ISJ0B 3ABL tiSBBS OF CALIFORNIA 

RenuMican nominee for Vice President 
(Prepared for delivery at Madison, 'vise. 
8:30 P.M., C.S.T., Thurs., Oct. 7, 1948) 



H9fttp„Ppt.8,1948 
, 6:00 ft*., E.5.T. 

48 



Mr. Chairman and fellow Americans: 

I am very hawoy to be rith you in the fine State of Wisconsin, here in the 
City of Madison, your capital and the site of your State University. 

Twenty-three days ago I left Sacramento, the capital city of my own State. 
In that time I have traveled through twenty-four states of the Union. I have had 
the privilege of meeting with our fellow-Americans along the way in nearly 100 cities 
and towns. 

I am particularly happy to be in Wisconsin tonight. First of all, I have 
never had the opportunity of visiting here bpfore. But, there is another reason. I 
believe there i9 a real kinshit> between the oeoole of your state and mine. 

This is the centennial year of your statehood. It is also the centennial of 
the discovery of gold in Cplifcrnia, an event that culminated in our admission to 
the Union in 1850. You were the 30th state and we were the 31st. 

We followed you into the Union, but the parallel between our states does not 
stop there. Wisconsin, like California, has been settled by people of many racial 
backgrounds who have brought the frontiers of our Fation ever westward in their 
search for wider opportunities. 

The industry and the thrift of these settlers and their descendants have 
built up sturdy populations in our states. In both there is living proof that men 
and women of various ancestries and traditions can live together in harmony and 
Join forces - as Americans - for the building of their state. 

Here, in Wisconsin, in 1854, the Republican Party was born - a new party 
determined to meet the critical problems of those days squarely upon principle. A 
grout) of your leaders, vieary with two decades of dissension and bitterness in the 
Nation, gathered together with men from other states to form a party of principle to 
which men of good will, seeking escape from the expediency and compromise of their 
day, could give their allegiance. 



Republican National Committer 

1337 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 



NCUIP DTirHCr Connecticut "™"* -n 

L Hi KtLtAot WASHINGTON 6. D. |f— ? l 

AS 




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Horning papers, Tues. Oct. 12, 1948 
Hadio 6:00 FM.,E5T.,Mon.0ct.ll,1948 

TEXT OP THE ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR THOMAS E. K5WT, HEP. 
HOMIK BE FOR PRESIDENT, DELIVERED AT HUNT ARMORY, PITTSBURGH, 
PENNSYLVANIA ON MONDAY 3TCHIBG, OCTOBER 11, 1948, AND BROAD- 
CAST OVER STATION WJAS AND THE NATION-WIDE NETWCKK OF 
COLUMBIA BROADCAST Il'G SYSTEM, FROM 8:30 to 9:00 3, 3. T. 

We are entering the final three weeks of the campaign to unite America. With 
the ominous overtones of division and strife in the world, there Is increasing evi- 
dence of the great good this election will do. It will revive the spiritual unity 
of our people. It will restore our unity and our strength in the cause of peace 
abroad. Most of all it will show the world that we are selecting a competent admi- 
nistration which understands the problems of world affairs. We are electing a 
Republican Administration that will unfailingly brick up the work cf its own repre- 
sentatives in the United Nations for peace. 

This campaign has taken me across the whole expanse of our wonderful country — 
from coast to coast and from the Mexican to the Canadian borders. I am deeply happy 
to be able to report to you that our people are rejecting the counsels of disunity 
and despair. They are welcoming the progress we can make for peace, stability and 
freedom when we get a competent national Administration with faith in itself and in 
the American people. 

You and I have a big job to do in the years ahead. But because of our faith 
we know that with an Administration devoted to the welfare of all of its people, we 
can do that job. We shall do it by advancing the principles of a free society in 
terms of better living for all our people. 

We have come to the time to look ahead instead of backward. We have come to 
the end of a period when Government fepds on its own blunders and failures. We are 
now witnessing the strange spectacle of an Administration that failed when it had a 
Democrat Congress and failed when it had a Republican Congress, and now denounces 
the elected representatives of the people in general and asks for another chance to 
fail again. That seems to be rubbing it in. We have had enough failures. It is 
time we began succeeding in the people's interest. 

Thi3 curious administration seems to be making a special point of asking men 
and women who belong to unions to /;ive it another chance to fail. It implies that 
somehow this group of good Americans is different from other good Americans. It 
suggests that labor has given this particular Administration a mortgage on its 
future. I suggest that no political party ha3 a mortgage on any American. We all 
are free men and women enjoying our inalienable rights under the guarantees of the